French Proverbs from 1611: Starting with the letter I

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[Ia coü ard n'aura belle amie:] [Prov.] Faint heart neuer woon faire Ladie.


[Iamais coup de iument ne fit mal à cheval:] [Prov.] [A womans blow nere hurt the man she loued.]
[Iamais coup de iument ne fit mal à cheval:] [Prov.] When women strike men it is not to hurt them; or, men seldome-times catch hurt by womens blowes.


[Iamais danseur ne fut bon clerc:] [Prov.] Neuer was dauncer good scholler.


[Iamais dormeur ne fit bon guet, ny paresseux ne fit beau faict:] [Prov.] [The sleepie head, and sloathfull hand, watch, and worke, ill alike.]


[Iamais Franç ois ne furent veus recreus de bien faire:] [Prov.] Frenchmen were neuer seene wearie of well-doing.


[Iamais grain ne fructifie si premier ne se mortifie:] [Prov.] [Seed neuer comes to fructifie vntill it first haue mortified.]


[Iamais grasse geline n'aima chapon:] [Pro.] [A wanton wife neuer loued a defectiue husband.]
[Iamais grasse geline n'aima chapon:] [Prov.] [A fat wife neuer loued a faint husband.]


[Iamais homme ne mange foye que le sien non ait ioye:] [Prov.] The liuer of the liuer-eater, is comforted and much the better.


[Iamais ne gaigne qui plaide à son seigneur; (ou qui procede à son Maistre:)] [Pro.] No man euer throue by suing his Lord or Maister; [(for either God blesses not so vndutifull a strife, or successe followes not in so vnequall a match.)]
[Iamais ne gaigne qui plaide à son seigneur:] [Prov.] [He neuer thriues who with his maister striues.]
[Iamais ne gaigne qui precede à son maistre:] [Pro.] [He neuer gaines that stands in suit with's maister.]


[Iamais putain n'ayma preud hom, ny grasse geline chapon:] [Pro.] Neuer did whore loue honest man, nor wanton wife her weake man.


[Iamais tigneux n'aima le pigne, ny chapon crester geline:] [Prov.] The guiltie cannot abide reproofe, nor a weake man a woman.


[Iamais tigneux n'aima le pigne:] [Prov.] [Neuer did Scabd iade loue the currycombe; nor a corrupt heart correction.]


[Iamais tu ne feras d'vn bruthier vn esperuier:] [Prov.] [A bald, and beastly kite will neuer proue good hawke.]


[Ia ne chante le coq si viendra le iour:] [Prov.] [Though the cocke neuer crow day will appeare.]


[Ia ne vienne demain qui n'apporte son pain:] [Prov.] [Let the next day produce it owne prouision;] or, let him not come next day that now comes vnprouided.


[Iardin aux faux-bourgs vaut cent solz au rebours:] [Prov.] A Garden in the suburbes is worth a hundred pound backwards; [(which diuers of our fond citizens haue to their cost found true.)]


[Ieune barbier, & vieil medecin:] [Prov.] [A young Chirurgian, and an old Physitian, (are commonly the best.)]


[Ieune chair, & vieil poisson:] [Prov.] [Old flesh, and young fish (is fit for the dish.)]
[Ieune chair, & vieil poisson:] [Prov.] Yong flesh, and old fish (are daintiest.)


[Ieune en sa croissance a vn loup en la panse:] [Pro.] [A youth in growing hath a Wolfe in his guts; viz. eats rauenously, greedily, or verie much.]
[Ieune en sa croissance a vn loup en la panse:] [Pro.] [Young springalls haue Woluish, or great appetites.]


[Ieunesse oiseuse vieillesse disetteuse:] [Prov.] [A lazie youth, a lowsie age.]
[Ieunesse oiseuse vieillesse disetteuse:] [Prov.] [An idle youth a needie age.]


[Il a pissé en beaucoup de neiges:] [Prov.] [Hee hath outliued many a bitter Winter.]


[Il cerche trop bas la Charité qui fouille pré s des fesses:] [Prov.] Tis an vntoward charitie thats groped for neere to the buttocks.
[Il cerche trop bas la charité qui fouille prez des fesses:] [Prov.] The charitie is too base that stoopes so low as the buttockes; or, hee lookes too low for charitie that gropes about the buttocks.


[Il commence bien à mourir qui abandonne son desir:] [Prov.] He that leaues to desire begins to dy.
[Il commence bien à mourir qui abandonne son desir:] [Prov.] [Who quits what he desires, begins to dye in earnest.]


[Il est bien fol qui à fol sens demande:] [Pro.] [He that expects a wise part from a foole, is the more foole of the two.]
[Il est bien fol qui à fol sens demande:] [Prov.] Hee's a true asse that lookes for wit in an asse.
[Il est bien fol qui à fol sens demande:] [Prov.] He is a verie foole that lookes for wit from a foole.


[Il est bien fol qui cuide tousiours vivre:] [Prov.] He is a verie asse that thinkes he shall liue euer.
[Il est bien fol qui cuide tousiours vivre:] [Prov.] [He that thinkes to liue euer is an Asse.]


[Il est bien fol qui s'oublie:] [Prov.] He is a right foole that forgets himselfe.
[Il est bien fol qui s'oublie:] [Prov.] [He that forgets himselfe's a verie goose.]


[Il est bien heureux qui se mesle de ses affaires:] [Prov.] [Happie is he that followes his owne businesse;]
[Il est bien heureux qui se mesle de ses affaires:] [Prov.] [He is verie happie that followes his owne businesse; (then is the dullard that cannot, the sluggard that will not, and the vnfree that must not, doe it, verie vnhappie.)]


[Il est bien povre qui ne voit goutte:] [Prov.] [He that sees nothing's poore ynough.]
[Il est bien povre qui ne voit goutte:] [Prov.] [He that wants eyes may well be tearmed poore.]
[Il est bien povre qu'ne voit goutte:] [Prov.] [Hee's verie poore that wants his eye-sight.]


[Il est bien tost deceu qui mal ne pense:] [Prov.] [The harmelesse minded man is soone deceiued.]


[Il est bien veau qui veau taille:] [Prov.] [He is a calfe that calues flesh cutteth; (A fit answer to a Butcher that calls a man Calfe.)]


[Il est cault larron qui desrobbe à vn larron:] [Prov.] [He is a cunning theefe that robs a theefe.]


[Il est mal caché à qui le cul paroist:] [Prov.] Hee is ill hid whose taile appeares; he worse dissembles whose worst parts appeare.
[Il est mal caché à qui le cul paroist:] [Prov.] Hee's but ill hid that shewes his taile; he is but a shallow dissembler that suffers the world to take notice of his worst humors.


[Il est plus aisé de se tirer de la rive que de du fond:] [Prov.] [Better may a man get from the brinke then from the bottome; a mischiefe is sooner crushed, a delight more easily cassed, when one is but dipped, then when he is plunged, into it.]


[Il est plus d'ouvriers que de maistres:] [Prov.] [There be more workemen then worke-maisters.]
[Il est plus d'ouvriers, que de maistres:] [Prov.] [There be more workmen then skilfull workmen.]


[Il est povre qui de Dieu est hay:] [Prov.] [Wretched is he who is abhord of God.]
[Il est povre qui est de Dieu haï:] [Prov.] [Poore is the man whom God abhorres.]


[Il est riche que Dieu aime:] [Prov.] [Rich is the man whom God affects.]


[Il est tost deceu qui mal ne pense:] [Prov.] [He that thinkes no harme is soone beguiled.]
[Il est tost deceu qui mal ne pense:] [Prov.] He that thinkes no hurt is soone deceiued; the harmelesse man is quickly ouer-raught.


[Il fait assez qui fait faire:] [Pro.] He doeth hurt, or good enough, that makes it to be done.


[Il fait beau pescher en eau large:] [Prov.] There is no fishing to the sea, say we.


[Il fait bon laisser le ieu quand il est beau:] [Prov.] [Tis good leauing at play when it is at the fairest;] or, tis good to leaue (when one hath got) at play.


[Il fait mauvais aller au bois quand les loups se mangent l'un l'autre:] [Prov.] [It is not good to goe to the wood when Wolues deuoure one another.]
[Il fait mauvais aller au bois quand les loups s'entremangent:] [Prov.] Tis ill going to the wood when wolues (are so hungrie, that they) eat one another.


[Il fault acheter maison faitte, & femme à faire:] [Pro.] [Purchase a house readie made, but let thy wife be of thine owne making.]
[Il faut acheter maison faicte, & femme à faire:] [Pro.] [(For by building is many a man vndone; and with a widow (if she list) any man shall haue ynough to doe.)]


[Il faut acheter vigne deserte:] [Prov.] [Buy an vndressed Vineyard; (so mayest thou fashion it according to thine owne humor.)]


[Il faut avoir mauvaise beste par douceur:] [Prov.] A mischieuous, froward, or curst beast must be reclaymed, caught, or woon, by faire meanes.


[Il faut discerner la peau de la chemise:] [Prov.] Wee must distinguish things which bee neere, from those which be further off, vs. [Plus pres est la chair que la chemise:] [Prov.] Our women say, neere is my petticoat but neerer is my smocke.
[Il faut discerner la peau de la chemise:] [Prov.] [Wee must put a difference betweene our skin, and our shirt.]


[Il faut hasarder vn petit poisson pour prendre vn grand:] [Pro.] [Hazard a little to gaine much.]
[Il faut hasarder vn petit poisson pour prendre vn grand:] [Prov.] [We must aduenture a pennie to gaine a pound.]


[Il faut laisser son enfant morveux plustost que luy arracher le nez:] [Prov.] [Better an inconuenience then a mischiefe; let the Henne liue although she haue the pip.]
[Il faut laisser son enfant morveux plustost que luy arracher le nez:] [Prov.] Better a snottie child then a noselesse.


[Il faut perdre vn veron pour pescher vn saulmon:] [Pro.] [Somewhat must be lost that much may be gotten.]
[Il faut perdre vn veron pour pescher vn Saulmon:] [Prov.] [A man must loose a feather to win a Goose; a small, to come by a great, matter.]
[Il faut perdre vn veron pour pescher vn saulmon:] [Prov.] [One must spend a little to gaine much.]
[Il faut perdre vn veron pour pescher vn Saul mon:] [Prov.] [We must loose a little that we may get much.]


[Il faut que l'herbe soit bien courte quand on ne trouve que repaistre:] [Prov.] [Commons must needs be short where no meat's to be come by.]
[Il faut que l'herbe soit bien courte quand on ne trouve que repaistre:] [Prov.] [The grasse had need be verie short where nothing's to be nibled.]


[Il n'aura ia bon marché qui ne le demande:] [Pro.] Let no man thinke to haue, that asks not, things good cheape.
[Il n'aura ia bon marché qui ne le demande:] [Prov.] [Those that require not, haue not, things good cheape.]


[Il ne choisit pas qui emprunte:] [Prov.] Borrowers must not be chusers.
[Il ne choisit pas qui emprunte:] [Prov.] Borrowers we say beggers are no chusers.


[Il ne demeure pas trop qui vient:] [Prov.] He tarries not too long that comes at length.
[Il ne demeure pas trop qui vient:] [Prov.] [He that comes at the length stayed not too long.]


[Il ne faut aller aux Meures sans crochet:] [Prov.] Mulberries must not be gathered without a hooke; nor harsh worke fingered with naked hands.
[Il ne faut aller aux meures sans crochet:] [Prov.] [We must not goe about a businesse without helpes to facilitate, and meanes to effect, it.]


[Il ne faut apprendre aux poissons à nager:] [Prov.] [We must not teach a fish to swimme; a scholler to read, a maister to worke, & c.]


[Il ne faut estre loup, ny en affubler la peau:] [Prov.] [One must neither be, nor seeme, naught.]
[Il ne faut estre loup, ny en affubler la peau.] [Prov.] We must neither be, nor seeme, naught.


[Il ne faut iamais courir apres son esteuf:] [Prov.] One must neuer let go a thing, which he hath, and may hold, with a purpose to follow, or for any hope to recouer, it;


[Il ne faut iouë r au boeuf:] [Prov.] [An Oxe is no fit, or no safe, play-fellow.]


[Il ne faut pas enquerir d'ou soit le dit, mais qu'il soit bon:] [Prov.] Inquire not whence a speech came so it be good.
[Il ne faut pas enquerir d'ou soit le vin, mais qu'il soit bon:] [Pro.] [No matter whence wine came so it be good.]


[Il ne faut pas lier les asnes auec les cheuaux:] [Pro.] Churles are not to be matcht, or sorted, with gentlemen.
[Il ne faut pas lier les asnes avec les chevaux:] [Pro.] Asses must not be tied vp among horses; nor vnworthie people consorted with the worthie.


[Il ne faut pas manger des Cerises avec les grands seigneurs:] [Prov.] [Meane men are not to eat cherries (viz. are not to be verie familiar) with great Lords; least the stones of the best flye faster at their eyes then (their portion) the worst into their mouthes. (Much alike whereunto, is;)] [Il ne faut pas manger des prunes avec son Seigneur:]


[Il ne parle pas au roy qui veut:] [Pro.] [Not euerie one that would, may speake to Kings.]
[Il ne parle pas au Roy qui veut:] [Prov.] [Euerie one hath not the Kings eare at commaund.]


[Il ne perd rien qui ne perd dieu:] [Prov.] Hee looses nothing that keepes God his friend.
[Il ne perd rien qui ne perd Dieu:] [Prov.] [Hee that keepes God to friend can nothing loose.]


[Il ne peut sortir du sac que ce qu'il y a dedans:] [Prov.] [You can haue no more of him then there is in him.]


[Il ne sç ait que c'est de vendre vin qui n'attend de May la fin:] [Prov.] [Against good husbandrie he hath offended, that sells his wines before May be full ended.]
[Il ne sç ait que c'est de vendre vin qui n'attend de May la fin:] [Prov.] [Belike because he cannot before that time guesse what will be the next yeares Vintage.]


[Il ne sç ait rien qui ne va par villes:] [Prov.] [Hee nothing knowes that knowes not more then his owne.]
[Il ne sç ait rien qui ne va par villes:] [Prov.] [He that goes not abroad knowes nothing.]


[Il ne sç ait rien qui ne veut bien faire:] [Pro.] He nothing knowes that will not do his dutie; or, vaine is the skill thats without vertue.
[Il ne sç ait rien qui ne veut bien faire:] [Pro.] [He that will not doe well is ignorant.]


[Il ne se faut fier ni à femme, ny au giron:] [Prov.] [(For neither of them keepes verie surely the things entrusted vnto them.)] {ed needs trans}


[Il ne se faut pas iouë r au boeuf:] [Pro.] [An Oxe is not to be dallied with.]


[Il ne se fourvoit point qui à bon hostel va:] [Prov.] [He goes not out of his way that goes to a good house.]
[Il ne se fourvoit point qui à bon hostel va:] [Prov.] He goes not out of his way that goes to a good Inne.


[Il ne se garde pas bien qui ne se garde tousiours:] [Prov.] He lookes not, that still lookes not, to himselfe; or, he gards not well, himselfe, that alwayes gards not.


[Il ne seroit nuls mesdisans s'il n'estoit des escoutans.] [Prov.] None would reuile if none would heare.


[Il ne se tort pas qui va plain chemin:] [Prov.] Hee goes not much awry that keepes the high road way.
[Il ne se tort pas qui va plain chemin:] [Prov.] [Hee that goes on plaine ground spraines not his foot; mischiefe attends those that take rugged wayes.]


[Il n'est banquet que d'homme chiche:] [Prov.] Wee say, there is no feast to the misers; [and by a misers feast we meane, a plentifull, though a rare, one.]


[Il n'est chance qui ne retourne:] [Prov.] [All things that haue beene will be; no chance but comes againe.]


[Il n'est chasse que de vieux chiens:] [Pro.] [There is no hunter to the old dog; no searcher to experience.]
[Il n'est chasse que de vieux chiens:] [Prov.] There is no hunting to the old dogs;; or, no dog hunts like the old one.


[Il n'est chasse que de vieux levrier:] [Prov.] An old dog hunts surest, bites sorest, holds what he catches, kils what he reaches.


[Il n'est cheval qui n'ait sa tare:] [Prov.] [He is liuelesse who is faultlesse.]


[Il n'est cheval qui n'ait son mehaing:] [Prov.] [No horse without some bruize; no man without one fault or other.]
[Il n'est cheval qui n'ait son meshain:] [Prov.] There is no creature perfect; euerie one is in some part, or point faultie, or defectiue; [The like is;] [Il n'est cheval qui n'ait sa tare:] [Prov.] &; [Il n'y a cheval si bien ferré qui ne glisse:] [Prov.] The best-shod horse doth slip sometimes.


[Il n'est danger que de vilain:] [Pro.] [A clowne (inraged) is most dangerous.]
[Il n'est danger que de vilain:] [Prov.] [The (incensed) churle is a most dangerous beast.]


[Il n'est envie que de moine:] [Prov.] [No enuie like a Monkes.]


[Il n'est feu que de gros bois:] [Pro.] Great wood makes the best fire.


[Il n'est horologe plus iuste que le ventre:] [Prov.] [No clocke more iust, or true, then the bellie;] or, the bellie is best dyall, to giue all things their triall.


[Il n'est ieu qu'à iouë urs:] [Prov.] [There is no playing with any that cannot play.]


[Il n'est ieu qu'a ioueurs:] [Prov.] [There's no good play but among Gamesters; or the best playing is with them that vnderstand what they play.]


[Il n'est miracle que de vieux saincts:] [Prov.] [We credit not reports, or miracles, of a fresh date; antiquitie is of awfull authoritie.]
[Il n'est miracle que de vieux saincts:] [Prov.] [We doe not credit reports, or miracles of a fresh date; Antiquitie is reuerend, and of awfull authoritie.]


[Il n'est miracle que de vieux saincts:] [Pro.] [Wonders of old are most authenticall.]


[Il n'est nager qu'en grand' eau:] [Prov.] The biggest waters are the best to swimme in.
[Il n'est nager qu'en grand eau:] [Prov.] [There is no swimming to the sea.]
[Il n'est nager qu'en grand eau:] [Prov.] [(We say)] [there is no fishing to the sea.]


[Il n'est oeuvre que d'ouvriers:] [Pro.] [There's no work, but by workmen, rightly done.]
[Il n'est oeuvre que d'ouvriers:] [Prov.] [No worke is rightly done but what a workeman does.]


[Il n'est orgueil que de povre enrichi:] [Prov.] No man's so surlie as th'inriched begger.
[Il n'est orgueil que de povre enrichi:] [Prov.] [There is no pride vnto th'inriched begger.]
[Il n'est orgueil que de povre enrichi:] [Prov.] [Th'inriched beggers pride's without compare.]


[Il n'est pas aise qui est courroucé:] [Prov.] Anger, and hearts-ease, are vtter enemies.
[Il n'est pas aise qui est courroucé:] [Prov.] Hee's not at ease thats in a chafe.


[Il n'est pas asseuré qui trop haut est monté:] [Prov.] He is not safe thats got too high; hee sits not sure that sits too high.


[Il n'est pas en seureté à qui ne mescheut oncques:] [Prov.] [He that hath had no ill lucke is in danger.]
[Il n'est pas en seurté à qui ne mescheust oncques:] [Prov.] [He stands not surely that did neuer slip.]


[Il n'est pas marchand qui tousiours gaigne:] [Prov.] [He trades not well that alwayes is a gainer.]


[Il n'est pas Masson qui pierres refuse:] [Pro.] [He is no Mason who refuseth stones.]
[Il n'est pas masson qui pierres refuse:] [Prov.] [The cunning Mason workes with any stone.]


[Il n'est pas mercier qui ne sç ait faire sa loge:] [Prov.] [The Pedlers gaine will be but small that cannot reare himselfe a stall.]


[Il n'est pas quite qui doibt de reste:] [Prov.] [He is not quit that oweth ought.]
[Il n'est pas quite qui doubt de reste:] [Pro.] [He is not out of debt that is to pay ought.]


[Il n'est pas tousiours feste:] [Prov.] Feasts last not alwayes; or, we must not alwayes thinke to feast it; euerie day is not Sunday (say we.)


[Il n'est pas tousiours saison de brebis tondre:] [Pro.] sheepe-sheering is not euer in season; silly people must haue some time allowed them to thriue in; so will their fleeces, at length, be worth clipping.


[Il n'est point de pire sourd que celuy qui ne veut ouï r:] [Prov.] [No man's more deafe then he that will not heare.]


[Il n'est que les premieres amours:] [Prov.] [The first loue is the fastest, or faithfullest; no loue's like to the first.]
[Il n'est que les premieres amours:] [Prov.] The first loue is the fastest; there is no loue to the first.


[Il n'est qu'une mauvaise heure au jour:] [Pro.] [There is but one ill (or vnluckie) houre in the day.]
[Il n'est qu'vne mauvaise heure au iour:] [Prov.] [One day hath in it but one lucklesse houre.]


[Il n'est si bon marinier qui ne perisse:] [Prov.] [The skilfullest Mariners feed Haddockes.]
[Il n'est si bon marinier qui ne perisse:] [Prov.] [The skilfull Sea-man comes at length short home.]


[Il n'est si bon qu'aussi bon ne soit:] [Prov.] The best man hath his match; the purest his Peere; one may be euerie way as good as another.


[Il n'est si bon que femme n'assotte:] [Prov.] The best man may b'asotted on a woman.
[Il n'est si bon que femme n'assotte:] [Prov.] The wisest man's assotted by a woman.
[Il n'est si bon qui femme n'assote:] [Prov.] The best man may be gulled by a woman.


[Il n'est si bon qui ne faille:] [Pro.] The best men commit faults; the wisest, errors.
[Il n'est si bon qui ne faille:] [Prov.] The best men haue their faults, the honestest their errors.


[Il n'est si grand despit que de pauvre orgueilleux:] [Prov.] There's no despight to that of a proud beggar.
[Il n'est si grand despit que de povre orgueilleux:] [Prov.] [A proud begger is the despightfullest creature aliue.]
[Il n'est si grand despit que de povre orgueilleux:] [Prov.] [The spight of a proud begger is vnmatchable.]


[Il n'est si grand iour que ne vienne vespre:] [Prov.] [The longest day is ended by an euening.]
[Il n'est si grand iour que ne vienne vespre:] [Prov.] [The longest day will haue a dawning.]
[Il n'est si grand iour qui ne vienne à vespre:] [Prov.] [The longest dayes haue euenings; (all earthlie things an end.)]


[Il n'est si petit crin qui ne porte son ombte:] [Prov.] The smallest haire hath it shadow; the least act a circumstance; the lowest word a sound.


[Il n'est si sage qui ne folie aucunes-fois:] [Prov.] [The wisest man doth sometimes play the foole.]
[Il n'est si sage qui ne folie aucunes fois:] [Prov.] The wisest man is foolish now and then.


[Il n'est vie que de coquins:] [Prov.] There's no life to the beggers;
[Il n'est vie que de coquins quand ils one assemblé leurs bribes:] [Prov.] There is no life (no mirth) to that of a company of beggers, hauing laied their scrips together.
[Il n'est vie que de coquins quand ils ont assemblé leurs bribes:] [Pro.] [Our countrey Fidlers haue a song which begins thus; Of all Occupations a beggar is the best, for when he is wearie, he may lay him downe and rest, & c.] {ed: this line appears in the middle of "The Jovial Begger", published in Playford's Choice Ayres, Songs, and Dialogues, 1676.}


[Il n'est vie que de faire bonne chere, mais la fin n'en vaut rien:] [Prov.] The life spent in good cheere hath a faire beginning but a foule end.
[Il n'est vie que de faire bonne chere, mais la fin n' en vaut rien:] [Prov.] [(Whether you consider the stuffe it turnes into, or the end it brings one to.)]


[Il n'est vie que d'estre bien aise:] [Pro.] [All happinesse, consists in quietnesse, of life.]
[Il n'est vie que d'estre bien aise:] [Prov.] Hee onely liues that liues contented; or, a lif's no life, without store of contentments.


[Il ne va pas du tout à honte qui de demie voye retourne:] [Prov.] He neuer goes through for shame, that turned backe when he was halfe way.
[Il ne va pas du tout à honte qui de demie voye retourne:] [Prov.] [He that turnes backe (hauing beene halfe way) goes not at all for shame.]
[Il ne va pas du tout à honte qui de demye voye retourne:] [Prov.] [Himselfe with shame he will not staine to goe, that hath turn'd back againe; he that hath once a course abandond hath not the face againe to stand on't.]


[Il n'y a cheval si bien ferré qui ne glisse:] [Prov.] [The best shod horse doth slip sometimes.]
[Il n'y a cheval si bien ferré qui ne glisse:] [Prov.] The wisest erre; the best offend; he that hath surest footing sometime falls.


[Il n'y a meilleur miroir que le vieil ami:] [Prov.] [An old friend an excellent looking-glasse.]


[Il n'y a pire eau que la quoye:] [Prov.] [Silent, musing, or dreaming spirits are (for the most part) more daungerous, or of a worse composition, then others.]
[Il n'y a pire eau que la quoye:] [Prov.] The stillest waters (and humors) are euer the worst.


[Il n'y a rien tel qu'un vieil pot à faire la bonne soupe:] [Pro.] [No pot makes so good pottage as the old one.]


[Il n'y a route que de vieux regnards:] [Prov.] [There is no chase like that of the old Fox; or, no tract so certaine as of aged craft; no path well beaten but by old experience.]


[Il n'y a si petit buisson qui ne porte ombre:] [Prov.] [The least bush hath it shadow;] [The like is]; [Vn poil fait ombre:] [Prov.] [A haire makes a shadow; the smallest things haue their shadowes; viz. their vse, or some ornament.]


[Il n'y a si petit Sainct qui ne desire sa chandelle:] [Prov.] There is no man in authoritie, how small soeuer, but lookes for the respect thats due vnto him.


[Il n'y a terme qui passe par delà celuy de frere:] [Prov.] Calls he me brother? how can he call me more? no friendlie tearme exceeds the tearme of brother.


[Il n'y eut iamais bon marché de peaux de lions:] [Prov.] [A Lyons skinne was neuer bought good cheape; the valiant euer sold their skinnes full deere.]


[Il peche sagement qui fait folie par conseil:] [Prov.] [He erres discreetly that erres by aduise.]
[Il peche sagement qui fait folie par conseil:] [Prov.] He wisely failes whom counsell makes to faile; or, faults done b'aduise are most excusable.


[Il plaidoye beau qui plaidoye sans partie:] [Pro.] [He fairely pleads that finds no Aduersarie.]
[Il plaidoye bien qui plaidoye sans partie:] [Prov.] [He pleads full well that pleads against none (or hath none to plead against) but himselfe.]


[Il s'a beau taire de l'escot qui ne paye rien:] [Prov.] He may wel ynough conceale the shot that payes no part of it.
[Il s'a beau taire de l'escot qui ne paye rien:] [Prov.] [He needs not blame a shot that payes nought towards it; he that will hold his purse may hold his peace.]


[Il semble à vn larron que chascun luy resemble:] [Prov.] [A theefe imagines euerie one bids, stand.]


[Il se peut bien seoir à table quand le maistre luy commande:] [Prov.] [He needs not wait thats bid sit downe by his maister.]
[Il se peut bien seoir à table quand le maistre luy commande:] [Prov.] [Well may he sit him downe whom he that may sets downe.]


[Il se peut bien seoir sans contredit qui se met là ou son hoste luy dit:] [Prov.] [Hee that sits where his host him bids, may lawfully keepe his place.]
[Il se peut seoir sans contredit qui se met là ou son hoste luy dit:] [Prov.] [He needs not feare to be chidden that sits where he is bidden;] [(The like is;)] [Il se peut bien seoir à table quand le maistre luy commande:] [Prov.] [Well may he sit him downe whom he that may sets downe.]


[Il suffit au iour de sa misere:] [Prov.] [One miserie is ynough at once.]


[Il vault mieulx tresbucher vne fois, que toujours chanceller:] [Prov.] Better fall at once, then stagger alwayes; better to erre altogether, then alwaies to wauer; better to step in for once, on the wrong side, then still to doubt what side he shall follow.
[Il vaut mieux trebucher vne fois que tousjours chanceller:] [Prov.] [Better at once to fall outright then euermore to stagger;]


[Il vaut mieux estre coquu que coquin:] [Prov.] Better be a cuckold than a beggerlie knaue.


[Il y a gens & gens:] [Prov.] [There are of all sorts, good and bad; there is much choice of, great difference in, men; one should not expect (that cannot deserue) as much as another.]


[Il y a plus de trompeurs que de trompes:] [Pro.] [The world is fuller of trumperie then of trumpetting.]


[Il n'a pas soif qui de l'eau ne boit:] [Prov.] Hee's not athirst that will not water drinke.
[I n'as pas soif qui de l'eau ne boit:] [Prov.] [Hee's not athirst that water drinkes not.]


[Ingratitude asseiche les fonts, & le temps renverse les ponts:] [Prov.] [Vnthankfulnesse dries bounties springs, and bridges time to ruine brings.]


[Ioye au coeur fait beau teint:] [Prov.] [Hearts-ioy giues to the face a beauteous tincture; a cheerefull conscience cleeres the countenance.]


[Ioye triste, & coeur travaillé:] [Prov.] All ioy hath sad effects in troubled hearts.


[Ioye triste coeur travaillé:] [Prov.] [Sad mirth denotes a troubled mind.]


[Ioyeuse, & riche vie pere, & mere oublie:] [Pro.] [Contentment and wealth gotten, makes father, and mother forgotten.]


[Ire de freres ire de Diables:] [Prov.] Brothers anger diuellish anger.
[Ire de freres ire de Diables:] [Prov.] [Brothers furie, diuelish follie.]


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