One should also bear in mind that the modern division between secular and sacred doesn&#39;t really line up with the way medieval people thought about things--the categories are different.<br><br>There certainly was theater in the Church (the &quot;Play of Daniel&quot; is yet another example).† And while there were edicts issued against such things as instrumental music and dance during church services, and against high-ranking churchmen keeping minstrels in their households, the fact that they had to be reissued several times indicates that they were not well-observed.<br>
<br>Tadhg<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Apr 6, 2009 at 11:14 AM, Greg Lindahl <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:lindahl@pbm.com">lindahl@pbm.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Netflix has a 2001 DVD of a South African performance of a mystery<br>
play:<br>
<br>
Heritage Theatre: The Mysteries<br>
<div class="im"><br>
&gt; Iím also curious though, does<br>
&gt; any one have any evidence for any time and place when the secular theater and<br>
&gt; the church did get along?<br>
<br>
</div>Depends on what you mean by &quot;get along&quot;. There are churches today<br>
which consider secular theater a horrible thing. In the Elizabethan<br>
era, theater was condemned by some and wasn&#39;t considered bad by<br>
others.<br>
<br>
-- Gregory<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
minstrel mailing list, <a href="mailto:minstrel@pbm.com">minstrel@pbm.com</a>, <a href="http://www.pbm.com/mailman/listinfo/minstrel" target="_blank">http://www.pbm.com/mailman/listinfo/minstrel</a><br>
To unsubscribe, send email to <a href="mailto:minstrel-request@pbm.com">minstrel-request@pbm.com</a> with a SUBJECT of unsubscribe<br>
<br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>