<div>{{But most are.&nbsp; (I had a friend who sang like &quot;Snow White&quot; even as a<br>child, and it drove our choir director crazy, so yes, it happens.)<br>People believe they should have it, and if they have to fake it by<br>
panting or moving their jaw, they&#39;ll do it.&nbsp; It takes a lot more air to<br>stay on pitch without any vibrato, which is why it&#39;s so frequently<br>taught.}}</div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div><font color="#000099">Interesting you should bring this up... I am a mezzo and I had a voice teacher in college who was also a mezzo and her take on a &#39;good&#39; verbrato was one that was <strong><u>not</u></strong> forced, but rather occurred naturally as part of the natural over and under tones of a note.&nbsp; I.e. you didn&#39;t need it to sound great, but if it occurred as a natural part of your singing/style, than it could enhance or complement your sound.&nbsp; On the flip side, a forced verbrato sounds forced and does not add to the beauty of your sound.</font></div>

<div><font color="#000099"></font>&nbsp;</div>
<div><font color="#000099">Just my two cents...</font></div>
<div><font color="#000099"></font>&nbsp;</div>
<div><font color="#000099">Jen</font><br>-- <br>Jen (SCA: Anna MacKenzie, bard ret.)<br><a href="mailto:BardofBH@gmail.com">BardofBH@gmail.com</a> </div>