Silvershell Music makes a lyre:<br>http://www.silvershellmusic.com/<br>I have one of these; it is good, although I think a different bridge would make it louder.<br><br>And so does Michael J King:<br>http://www.michaeljking.com/<br>I wish I could afford one of these.<br><br>Several online stores carry "Davidic" lyres, which are hypothetical (I think) reconstructions of ancient Jewish instruments.&nbsp; Not sure if you'd be interested in those or not.<br><br>There are even others; you might consider joining the lyre mailing list:<br>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Anglo_Saxon_Lyres/<br>and asking around there.&nbsp; Despite the name, the conversation often covers lyres and lyre-ish instruments from many places.<br><br>Benjamin Bagby tunes pentatonically (C-D-F-G-a-c would be an example of the pattern); Hucbald (our period source) indicates it would have been diatonic (C-D-E-F-G-a).&nbsp; I used to tune pentatonically, but have been trying to work with Hucbald's tuning; I've
 done plucking (like Bagby) and block-and-strum both.&nbsp; Both tunings and both techniques have advantages and disadvantages.&nbsp; I can blither on at length, either on-list or off, if you are interested.<br><br>I would really, really encourage you to try improvisation on your lyre.&nbsp; Mine is what got me into it, and it's transformed the way I look at early music and performance.&nbsp; It's also, incidentally, what Bagby does - although I'm sure months and years of practice have many of his "themes" in his fingers, he does not have a "score" for his performance.<br><br>My always in-progress notes on improvisation are here:<br>http://moeticae.typepad.com/mi_contra_fa/improvisation-for-melody-instruments.html<br>if you are interested.&nbsp; Learning to improvise means no wrong notes, no running out of repertoire, and (IMO) deep personal satisfaction coming from creating.&nbsp; I can play melodies alone, accompany spoken, chanted or sung poetry, or provide interludes
 between sections of stories.&nbsp; It's very versatile.<br><br>&nbsp;- Teleri<br><br><b><i>crystal verdon &lt;roseofamber@hotmail.com&gt;</i></b> wrote:<blockquote class="replbq" style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;">   <style> .hmmessage P { margin:0px; padding:0px } body.hmmessage { FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY:Tahoma } </style>  Oh, yes! The Beowulf performance was what got me thinking about it. I am an actor by trade and want to incorporate more bardic arts in my SCA play. I have told some stories at bardic events, but would very much like to add some simple music into my storytelling. I am not a skilled musician, but the few times I've had the opportunity to play with a harp, it felt very natural. So, I am leaning toward a lyre.&nbsp;Does anyone know where one can find a simple and inexpensive lyre on which to learn? Also, sources for music? I have found the site about how to make one, but I am not ready for that
 yet...<br> Thank you for your advice!<br> Roismaire&nbsp;<br><br><hr>Use video conversation to talk face-to-face with Windows Live Messenger. <a href="http://www.windowslive.com/messenger/connect_your_way.html?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_Refresh_messenger_video_042008" target="_new">Get started!</a>_______________________________________________<br>minstrel mailing list, minstrel@pbm.com, http://www.pbm.com/mailman/listinfo/minstrel<br>To unsubscribe, send email to minstrel-request@pbm.com with a SUBJECT of unsubscribe<br><br></blockquote><br><p>&#32;



      <hr size=1>Be a better friend, newshound, and 
know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. <a href="http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=51733/*http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ "> Try it now.</a>