No subject


Mon Nov 1 19:54:25 PST 2004


O'Bedlam is a lot like my other favorite tune, Suil A Ruin. Some is in 
period, some isn't. I've been collecting the lyrics for versions of both 
these songs for quite some time now, and I am trying to figure out just that 
question, "Is it period?". ::grins:: If anyone on the list has the lyrics to 
a version of either Tom O'Bedlam or Suil A Ruin, and you are willing to 
share, please email them to me privately. As for the tune of Tom O'Bedlam, I 
don't know of any sheet music for it, since I learned it by ear at 
meet'n'greet at Ren Faire. Annwn does a fair "rocked out" version of it 
though. The original tune is there, but some of the bridges are monotone.
Okay, enough babbling.
Aibhilin.

PS:
For Calino Costurame, one of the gals from Anuna, Kate McMahon, has an album 
out called After the Morning. She does a fair rendition of it on there, as 
well as the title song After the Morning. Check it out. A



~~~~~~~~~~~
Melissa Frolli
http://www.angelfire.com/ca3/rabbitlady

To see a world in a grain of sand,
and heaven in a wild flower
To hold infinity in the palm of your hand
and Eternity in an hour.
    -- William Blake, "Into to Songs of Innocence"





>From: "Lisa and Ken Theriot" <lnktheriot at cox.net>
>To: <minstrel at pbm.com>
>Subject: Re: minstrel: Tom O' Bedlam, Calino
>Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2003 10:48:31 -0500
>
>Cara,
>
>As Greg said, the trouble with dating this song is the large number of
>variants.  Chappell (Old English Popular Music) goes on for pages.  The
>first important thing to know is that the "Mad Maudlin goes on dirty
>toes" version, which is the one you hear most often, comes from "Pills
>to Purge Melancholy" (as "Mad Maudlin to find out Tom of Bedlam", vol.
>II, p. 192) and dates only to 1700/1707:
>
>To find my Tom of Bedlam
>Ten thousand years I'll travel
>Mad Maudlin goes, with dirty toes,
>To save her shoes from gravel
>Yet will I sing, Bonny boys, bonny mad boys
>Bedlam boys are bonny
>They still go bare, and live by the air,
>And want no drink nor money
>
>
>Mad Maudlin makes an earlier appearance in "Wit and Drollery" in 1656:
>
>Forth from the Elysian fields
>A place of restless souls
>Mad Maudlin is come to seek her naked Tom
>Hell's fury she controls...
>
>The opening verse given with the early tune is:
>
>From the hagg and hungrie goblin
>That into rags would rend yee
>And the spirit that stands by the naked man
>In the booke of moones defend yee
>While I do sing any foode, any feeding,
>Feeding, drinke or clothing
>Come dame or maid, be not afraid
>Poore Tom will injure nothing.
>
>
>The tune with the "dirty toes" version is also described as "an
>imperfect copy" of the earlier tune, which is pretty charitable, since
>to my ear it is VERY different, though you can see similarities.
>Chappell gives the music from a "MS. of Virginal Music in the possession
>of Dr. Rimbault; Musick's Delight on the Cithren, 1666, &c.", which
>stands a good chance of being the original broadside tune, so if you
>can't find Simpson, perhaps you can find Chappell (I got mine off eBay
>for $5, a very happy steal...).  Failing that, I can try to scan it and
>send it to you, or send a copy via snail mail.
>
>According to the notes in Chappell, the "Tom of Bedlam" character became
>popular after the dissolution of religious houses by Henry VIII, which
>action caused lots of infirm of mind to wander the countryside who were
>formerly cared for in alms houses by convents and monasteries.
>Apparently otherwise healthy layabouts discovered that running around
>half naked and sticking pins in your flesh was a good way to make a
>living (if you've ever seen the Monty Python sketch about professional
>village idiots, it's not as far off as it sounds).  A class of beggars,
>called variously "Tom's flock of wild geese", "Poor Toms", and "Abraham
>Men" were described in _Bellman of London_ in 1616.
>
>
>On an unrelated note, I don't know why I didn't check Chappell when I
>was looking up Calino Casturame, but he preserves an Anglicized Gaelic
>title of "Colleen Oge Astore", which is clearly <Caoilinn O/g> for the
>first part.  My best guess is for the full title would be "Caoilinn o/g
>na h-astair mi", 'my fair young lady (whom I love) at a distance from
>me'.
>
>
>Adelaide
>
>
>_______________________________________________
>minstrel mailing list, minstrel at pbm.com, 
>http://www.pbm.com/mailman/listinfo/minstrel
>To unsubscribe, send email to minstrel-request at pbm.com with a SUBJECT of 
>unsubscribe


_________________________________________________________________
MSN 8 with e-mail virus protection service: 2 months FREE*  
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/virus




More information about the minstrel mailing list