minstrel: bardic circles

J. Michael Shew jshewkc at pei.edu
Wed Apr 23 16:02:05 PDT 1997


	Bardic Cirdles not being period?  HMMMMMMMMMMMM........
	In my research I have found that Norse Skalds  met on the
road while traveling and shared an evening of entertainment.  Since many
of them traveled with students, it meant that there might be six or twelve
people in a circle about a fire trading poems, stories, and song.  Isn't
this a bardic circle?  It dates to about 700 c.e.
	Then the jongluers used to meet on the way to fairs, and spent
their time exchanging material...
	Also, a friend of mine who does much deeper Biblical research than
I think is healthy has pointed out a rabinical mention of singers who
"congregate on the roads edge on the days prior to feasts" to exchange
tales and sing for one another....Sometime around 104 b.c......
	I think they are period...
	Mikal Hrafspa 

____________________________________________________________________________
    Mikal the Ram; an annoying Bard of no redeeming qualities
__________________________(jshewkc at pei.edu)________________________________
Dread Jarl of the Vanir       in the storm wind victorious
By your grace this sea steed      treads pathways of silver. 
We honor with whispers     like the sound of wave song
Your wild waters     and fair wind words

			(JOHNSAGA)


On Wed, 23 Apr 1997 mn13189 at WCUVAX1.WCU.EDU wrote:

> 
> On Wed, 23 Apr 1997, Muirgheal wrote:
> 
> > Is this true?  Bardic circles are so basic, I've always thought of them as 
> > ancient.  Hasn't mankind always gathered in informal groups to sing or recount 
> > stories?  I would think it's only been in the last few decades, as technology 
> > has started to overshadow this practice that it's fallen into disuse.  The 
> > term "bardic circle" may be un-period, but surely the practice isn't.
> > Muirgheal
> 
> I suggest a ceilidh as a period example of a bardic circle.  What the term
> signifies today is a consert of Celtic (usually Scottish) music, with a
> line-up of various performers.  What the term *originally* meant was
> something quite different.
> "Ceilidh" is actually the Gaelic term for "visit."  People would gather in
> someone's sheilan, or cottage, all sit around the fire in the middle of
> the room, and stay up late (sometimes until morning) sharing songs and
> stories.  Everyone would participate.  These people were not professional
> performers, just regular folk having a good time.
> This is probably the closest thing you'll find to a period bardic circle.
> Aye,
> Eogan
> 
> 
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