<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">
<DIV>I was interested to read Ian Levingston's identification of a Daldos board scratched into a barrel top salvaged from the Mary Rose:</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><A href="http://boardgameblog.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/dald%C3%B8s-in-16th-century-england/" rel=nofollow target=_blank>http://boardgameblog.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/dald%C3%B8s-in-16th-century-england/</A></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>As he points out, this would appear to be the second instance of a board from England, if one accepts that a drawing in a thirteenth-century manuscript held at Trinity College also depicts a&nbsp;diagram for this type of game.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>Thierry Depaulis ('An Arab game in the North Pole?', Board Game Studies, 4, 2001, pp. 77-82 [80]) concludes that the component Dal- in Daldos<FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Regular><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Regular><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Regular>&nbsp; '</FONT></FONT></FONT><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Regular><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Regular><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Regular>may be explained in the light of an old English word </FONT></FONT></FONT><I><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Italic><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Italic><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Italic>daly </I></FONT></FONT></FONT><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Regular><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Regular><FONT color=#231f20 face=AGaramond-Regular>whose meaning was&nbsp; “knucklebone”, “small piece of bone”, whence “die”'.&nbsp;Alternatively one&nbsp;could&nbsp;suggest the English word 'tally' - a wooden
 stick notched or 'scored' to keep a record of commercal transactions and game points. 'Tally-dice', in fact, would neatly characterise the two implements used in Daldos, while approximating phonetically to the Norwegian name.</FONT></FONT></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20>If the game did indeed have some foothold in the British Isles it may be that there are other yet-to-be-identified examples of&nbsp; Daldos-type boards (among Cathedral cloister etchings, for instance) as well as references in regional glossaries, dialect dictionaries etc. Now, at least we have a reason to be on the look-out for these!</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20>Best wishes,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20>Robert.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#231f20 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></div><br>




      </body></html>