<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2800.1106" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Peter,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>The markings on the four sided die&nbsp;that 
Willughby describes makes more sense for playing Put and Take without question, 
and so I look forward to your ideas on the development on of the markings on the 
later eight sided die.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>One aspect of playing put and take with the four 
sided die as opposed to the eight sided one is a social/spacial consideration. 
An eight sided die can be rolled easily and therefore played on a table top with 
those playing sitting around it. The totum/teetotum similarly. A four sided die 
would have to be small for it to be thrown properly in a small space and have 
sufficient chance to fall on any of its four sides equally. Is there any 
suggestion of size of these dice and what they were made out of? </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>I have seen photographs of Indian long dice (4 
sided) probably 19 C and these seem to be several inches long. </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>jon</FONT></DIV></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>