<DIV id=RTEContent>Hi James!</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>It is always amusing to see where these threads lead.</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>I think Strutt may have been right when he said the top and skittles game was called Devil among the Tailors.&nbsp; Of course, that does not stop the same name being given to the skittles and swinging&nbsp;weight game that you describe. The phrase Devil among the Tailors has a wider metaphorical sense (a disturbance of tranquillity) that could well apply to both games. One-to-one correspondence between game and name is not guaranteed with old games!</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>The big Oxford English Dictionary gives only the spinning top version:</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>  <DIV><FONT size=3><FONT face="Arial Unicode MS"><B><I><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN">the d. among the tailors</SPAN></I></B><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN">: a row going on (see Farmer <I>Slang Dict.</I> s.v.); also a game. <?xml:namespace
 prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></SPAN></FONT></FONT></DIV>  <DIV class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman"><FONT size=3><B><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN">1834</SPAN></B><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN"> L</SPAN></FONT><SPAN lang=EN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-ansi-language: EN">D</SPAN><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN"><FONT size=3>. L</FONT></SPAN><SPAN lang=EN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; mso-ansi-language: EN">ONDONDERRY</SPAN><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN"><FONT size=3> <I>Let.</I> 27 May in <I>Court Will. IV &amp; Victoria</I> (1861) II. iv. 98 Reports are various as to the state of the enemy's camp, but all agree that there is the devil among the tailors. <B>1851</B> </FONT><A href="http://dictionary.oed.com/help/bib/oed2-m2.html#mayhew" target=oedbib><SPAN style="COLOR: #002653"><FONT size=3>M</FONT></SPAN><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR:
 #002653">AYHEW</SPAN></A><FONT size=3> <I>Lond. Labour</I> (1861) II. 17 A game known as the ‘Devil among the tailors’..a top was set spinning on a long board, and the result depended upon the number of men, or ‘tailors’, knocked down by the ‘devil’ (top) of each player.</FONT></SPAN></FONT></DIV>  <DIV class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><FONT face="Times New Roman"><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN"><FONT size=3></FONT></SPAN></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN"><FONT face=arial><o:p>Of course, it is possible that Mayhew was copying Strutt, but I don't think so: the 'long board' he describes seems to be different from Strutt's 'circular board'.&nbsp; So we seem to have two sorts of spinning top and skittles games, both called Devil among the Tailors.</o:p></FONT></SPAN></DIV>  <DIV class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN"><FONT
 face=arial><o:p></o:p></FONT></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0cm 0cm 0pt"><SPAN lang=EN style="mso-ansi-language: EN"><FONT face=arial><o:p>Just to throw something else in, did you know that Devil among the Tailors is the name of a firework?&nbsp; As I recall, it consists of a bunch of Roman Candles taped round a jack in the box.&nbsp; The Roman Candles fire first, and give a picture of tranquil activity, like sewing.&nbsp; Then the jack in the box fires with a loud bang, sending jumping crackers everywhere. There may be other versions.</o:p></FONT></SPAN></DIV></DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>Best wishes - and thanks for your comments as ever</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>Adrian</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV><BR><BR><B><I>james@tradgames.org.uk</I></B> wrote:</DIV>  <BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">Chaps,<BR><BR>I have some info on this as I've recently become interested in this
 game.<BR>(Actually, I have the very same modern version of the game in the link you<BR>gave:<BR>http://woodexpressions.com/499009.jpg. It's called Tirolean Roulette on my<BR>version. Not sure if that means anything, however.)<BR><BR>The quote from Strutt that Adrian gave is actually rather misleading by<BR>Strutt because Devil amongst the tailors has long referred to the English<BR>pub game table skittles with a ball on a chain. Perhaps in his day this was<BR>indeed the term used for the game but I do wonder if he got confused or was<BR>misled. The game in question is in modern times known as Table a Toupie<BR>(sorry French people - I can't do accents on my letters) in French and<BR>Toptafel in Flemish. It's also very popular in the USA where they usually<BR>just call it "Skittles" (which confuses things considerably more). I sell a<BR>modern version in my shop mainly to Americans.<BR><BR>Adrian's implication of a link, is in my view, justified. There is what<BR>appears to be a
 geneological missing link. There is a Victorian game called<BR>Cannonade or Castle Bagatelle which is a large circular table with sides.<BR>Around the sides are little rooms and in each a skittle (that looks like a<BR>castle) like Toptafel. However, instead of the spinning top knocking over<BR>the pins, the top hits balls in the middle of the table and the balls have<BR>to go through little hoop entrances into the rooms in order to topple the<BR>pins.<BR><BR>So you see, in order to convert Cannonade into HolzRoulette, you simply need<BR>to remove the pins.<BR><BR>One more point of interest - in Cassells book of fireside fun that mentions<BR>Cannonade, it also says "There is a version of this game known at the toy<BR>shops as the "Game of Bombardment". It is a German introduction and<BR>although not so good a game..."<BR><BR>So, is the game German or English? It seems to be generally thought of as<BR>German but Cannonade was published in 1854 by Jaques. Does anyone have any<BR>other
 dates?<BR><BR><BR>James Masters<BR>www.tradgames.org.uk<BR><BR><BR><BR>_______________________________________________<BR>hist-games mailing list<BR>hist-games@www.pbm.com<BR>http://www.pbm.com/mailman/listinfo/hist-games<BR></BLOCKQUOTE>  <DIV><BR></DIV>