<HTML><HEAD>
<META charset=UTF-8 http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2600.0" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff">
<DIV>
<DIV>In a message dated 2/5/04 4:40:26 PM Eastern Standard Time, cswingle@iarc.uaf.edu writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid"><FONT face=Arial>Has anyone found reference, or done experiments to determine what an <BR>appropriate, mashable replacement might be for brown (or amber) malt?&nbsp; <BR>Do you suppose this can be a simple as reducing the home-roasted malts <BR>to the requisite 20% of the grist, and then adding enough crystal to get <BR>the color (and presumably some of the roasted flavor too) up to the <BR>level you expect from the original recipe?</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp; I have been told that pale malt contains enough amylase to convert itself 
<DIV>and half its weight in non-diastatic grains, which should be enough for any </DIV>
<DIV>brew I can think of.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; BTW, crystal malt is a 19th-century development, and requires technology</DIV>
<DIV>(a sealed kiln) which was not available before that.</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Scotti</DIV></DIV></BODY></HTML>