<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 6/29/2003 9:40:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, owenbrau@earthlink.net writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">It's been some time since we've done much period work, so we're kind of<BR>
starting over here. Our mash was far too hot; we mashed in the water we knew<BR>
we needed in order to get out the right amount, but Markham says to add<BR>
"water near to boiling", so our mash wound up at 180F+, and we wound up<BR>
having to add more malt to it after it has cooled some in order to get any<BR>
conversion. Help!<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It has to do with how they added the water:&nbsp; They ladled it in.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Master Ateno and Master Geoffrey de Wigan did some experimental<BR>
work after noticing that in Markham, and developed the "Four Ounce Ladle" <BR>
method.&nbsp; For a 5 gallon batch, turn off the heat under your strike water and <BR>
ladle it into the mash vessel with a four ounce ladle, stirring three times <BR>
between ladles.&nbsp; When you're done the mash temp will be 151-155 F.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Scotti</FONT></HTML>