<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1">
  <title></title>
</head>
<body>
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:PBLoomis@aol.com">PBLoomis@aol.com</a> wrote:<br>
 
<blockquote type="cite" cite="mid99.38631856.2c07fffb@aol.com"><font
 face="arial,helvetica"><font size="2" family="SANSSERIF" face="Arial"
 lang="0">True, wheat aids head retention, but Markham is talking about a
  <br>
 beer that is to be kegged for a year or more.&nbsp; I would expect it to <br>
 be thoroughly flat by that time, in which case head retention is moot.</font></font></blockquote>
 It's amazing how much pressure a wooden cask can withstand when properly 
sealed. &nbsp;Wahl and Henius (1902) give examples of highly-carbonated styles 
being kegged in wooden kegs of the era. &nbsp;Wooden kegs didn't fall out of favor 
until around WW2. &nbsp;Starting with a highly carbonated beer, you're bound to
still have a fair degree of carbonation, even after a year. &nbsp;Unfortunately,
the knowledge and skill required to build and maintain casks of sufficient
quality to maintain carbonation in beer is an almost lost art. &nbsp;Outside of
a few people in England who still make firkins and such for cask-conditioned
ales, they have largely been replaced by SS kegs.<br>
 
<blockquote type="cite" cite="mid99.38631856.2c07fffb@aol.com"><font
 face="arial,helvetica"><font size="2" family="SANSSERIF" face="Arial"
 lang="0">Markham does not specify whether the wheat and oats are malted
  <br>
 or not, but before 1600 AD most brewing grains seem to have been. </font></font></blockquote>
 My own studies haven't borne this out in all cases. &nbsp;I could be reading
this wrong. &nbsp;But most of my readings mention malt when talking of malted
products and call the grains in question by their true name when talking
of them in their raw state. &nbsp;Granted I haven't had much luck finding 1st
hand accounts for brewing outside of England. &nbsp;My interest lies mostly in
the brewing practices of the low countries.<br>
 
<blockquote type="cite" cite="mid99.38631856.2c07fffb@aol.com"><font
 face="arial,helvetica"><font size="2" family="SANSSERIF" face="Arial"
 lang="0">It has been my experience that malted oats do not build mouthfeel,
as<br>
 rolled oats do, but instead contribute to smoothness.</font></font></blockquote>
 I haven't had the pleasure(?) of working with malted oats yet. &nbsp;But I think 
the ability of the malted oats to contribute to mouthfeel would be inversely 
proportional to the degree of conversion in the malt. &nbsp;Highly modified malt 
might not contribute much, but chit malt would contribute quite a bit.<br>
 
<blockquote type="cite" cite="mid99.38631856.2c07fffb@aol.com"><font
 face="arial,helvetica"><font size="2" family="SANSSERIF" face="Arial"
 lang="0">Natheless, these portions seem very small, to the point where I
  <br>
 wonder whether they would have the desired effect.&nbsp; Owen is also a <br>
 professional brewer, and I think that is what he was asking.</font></font></blockquote>
 You only need very small amounts when using them in this aspect. &nbsp;I use
on average between 0.5-1.0% (by extract) in my various recipes. &nbsp;In my Cream 
Ale recipe, I use only 8# of rolled oats in a 7 bbl batch, and it contributes 
to a very rocky head and a smooth, silky mouthfeel.<br>
 <br>
 
<pre class="moz-signature" cols="$mailwrapcol">-- 
Mike Bennett
Brewer for Hire
Recognized BJCP Beer Judge
[1958, 287.1] Apparent Rennerian
mjb&lt;at&gt;efn.org
mjbennett69&lt;at&gt;yahoo.com

....Give a man a beer, he'll waste an hour.  
Teach a man to brew and he'll waste a lifetime....</pre>
</body>
</html>