<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 5/29/2003 3:59:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, mjb@efn.org writes:<BR>
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">What probably happened is that the brewer noticed through empirical observations that the use of small amounts of wheat contributed to greater head retention (everyone likes good head) and that oats contributed to a fuller mouthfeel which might be lacking from the use of pease.<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; True, wheat aids head retention, but Markham is talking about a <BR>
beer that is to be kegged for a year or more.&nbsp; I would expect it to <BR>
be thoroughly flat by that time, in which case head retention is moot.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Markham does not specify whether the wheat and oats are malted <BR>
or not, but before 1600 AD most brewing grains seem to have been. <BR>
It has been my experience that malted oats do not build mouthfeel, as<BR>
rolled oats do, but instead contribute to smoothness.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Natheless, these portions seem very small, to the point where I <BR>
wonder whether they would have the desired effect.&nbsp; Owen is also a <BR>
professional brewer, and I think that is what he was asking.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Scotti</FONT></HTML>