<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">In a message dated 4/10/2003 10:40:11 PM Eastern Standard Time, maltster@NOGY.NET writes:<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"> <BR>
I have not heard of the four-ounce ladle method... is this for the addition of the barm?<BR>
</BLOCKQUOTE><BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; No, it's for mash temperature control without a thermometer, since <BR>
thermometers which could be used for this purpose are 18th century.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Master Geoffrey de Wigan (EK) developed it, based on a remark in <BR>
Gervase Markham (1615) about "ladling" the strike water into the grain.<BR>
It won Geoffrey his Laurel, as well it should.&nbsp; Brilliant work!&nbsp; Exactly what<BR>
the SCA is about!<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; For five gallons, use a four-ounce ladle.&nbsp; Bring your strike water to a <BR>
boil, and turn off the heat.&nbsp; Ladle the water, a dipper at a time, stirring <BR>
three strokes with your wooden spoon between dippers.&nbsp; It is best to have<BR>
two people, as this gets tiring and they need to switch off.&nbsp; Keep going <BR>
until the water in the kettle is so shallow you cannot fill the dipper.&nbsp; Pour<BR>
in the remainder.&nbsp; Now, stick in your anachronistic thermometer; the mash<BR>
temperature will be between 150 and 154.<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Is that Neat?<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8-)<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Scotti<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <BR>
</FONT></HTML>