<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">I have been doing research on the use of sugar in brewing and found this interesting web site on spices and other period supplies.&nbsp; I received the following response about loaf sugar from the proprietor.&nbsp; I thought that it would be of interest since sugar appears in various period recipes and the site calls themselves "PURVEYORS OF GOODS FOR HISTORICAL COOKERY AND LIVING"<BR>
<BR>
JazzboBob<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
Greetings</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"><BR>
 <BR>
</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">We do have sugar loaves (small ones), but they are white rather than brown sugar. "Loaf sugar" refers to the shape of the block of sugar, not its flavor. Until the late 19th century sugar did not come in granulated form, as it does today, but in a solid block, or loaf, which was in the shape of a cone, rounded at the top. This is (inverted) the shape of the felt strainer into which the sugar syrup was poured to let the water seep out, and in which shape the sugar solidified. To use your sugar, you broke off a piece and powdered it (if powdered was needed), then used it. (Every so often you will see, in antique shops, "sugar snippers," which were used to cut pieces down into lump size for use with tea and coffee.&nbsp; Therefore, when a recipe calls for "loaf sugar," all that it means is "ordinary sugar," whatever is ordinary in the day of the recipe.</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"><BR>
 <BR>
</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">Yours sincerely,</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"><BR>
</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">David Dendy / <A HREF="mailto:ddendy@silk.net">ddendy@silk.net</A><BR>
partner in Francesco Sirene, Spicer / <A HREF="mailto:sirene@silk.net">sirene@silk.net</A><BR>
Visit our Website at <A HREF="http://www.silk.net/sirene/">http://www.silk.net/sirene/</A></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"><BR>
<BR>
<BR>
I also found this baking supply place to have some unusual sugars, syrups, grains and flours available.&nbsp; They even have malted rye.<BR>
www.bakerscatalogue.com</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"><BR>
 <A HREF="http://www.kingarthurflour.com/cgibin/start/ahome/fromoutside2.html?anchor_name=cata">Click here: Welcome to The Baker's Catalogue</A> <BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
</FONT></HTML>