<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">I have received several requests for recipes for ginger.<BR>
My first brewing experience came from Charlie Papazian's Barkshack Ginger Mead.&nbsp; Please check his Joy of Brewing text for the recipe.&nbsp; I bet his recipe has inspired more mead brewers then anything else out there.&nbsp; It's a versatile recipe and suitable to a wide amount of experimenting.&nbsp; I use all honey instead of corn sugar.<BR>
My other inspiration comes from a gold winning AHA mead recipe done in 1991 by Stephen Yuhas and Ed Gilles.&nbsp; This is in Zymurgy Vol. 14, No. 4 Special 1991.<BR>
<BR>
I do a few types of Ginger Mead - Sparkling Dry, Sparkling Sweet, &amp; Still Sweet<BR>
They all start from a similar recipe, but I alter the character with the yeast selection and honey variety.<BR>
<BR>
I use 14 to 15 # of honey and 5 to 6 ounces fresh ginger to brew a total volume of 5.5 gallons in the primary.&nbsp; I like to add some yeast nutrient and 1 Tablespoon tartaric acid, but purists can follow their own practices. The result is a 5 gallon secondary after racking.&nbsp; <BR>
Bring 4 gallons water to boil and add chopped and peeled ginger for 10 minutes.&nbsp; Turn off light and add honey to dissolve in water.&nbsp; Boiling types can bring it back for a 5 minute boil to skim off impurities before cooling, otherwise simply cool the must down to pitching temperature ASAP.&nbsp; I have a good copper chiller.&nbsp; Strain the ginger out of the must on the way to the fermentor.&nbsp; This is important because the natural preservative power of the fresh ginger will inhibit the yeast from fermenting.&nbsp; I didn't strain one brew and waited several frustrating days while it wouldn't ferment.&nbsp; I finally strained it into a new fermentor and it took off overnight. <BR>
The yeast selection will make all the difference with this brew.&nbsp; Use an ale yeast if you want it to be sweet and a wine or Champagne yeast if you want it dry.&nbsp; British ale strains tend to end in the FG 20 to 30 range (Very sweet), Wyeast American 1056 seems to drop to 10 or 15 FG for a medium sweet, and wine yeasts go to O or below.&nbsp; You can prime this mead with 1/2 cup dextrose to carbonate in the bottle or you can keg and force carbonate.&nbsp; This makes a great summer drink out of a keg.&nbsp; The sweet version is ready to drink in as short as 3 months while the dry takes 6 months to a year to properly mature.&nbsp; The key is brewing from a relatively low starting gravity of 90.&nbsp; Be sure the mead is finished fermenting before bottling.&nbsp; I use strong yeast starters, forced medical grade OX prefermentation, and get vigorous fermentations that usually finish in a few weeks.&nbsp; I can then age in a secondary till I'm ready to bottle or keg.<BR>
<BR>
This is a good mead to experiment with honey varieties.&nbsp; Clover is the lightest, Orange and Tupelo are a bit fuller, Wildflower can be interesting but a bit stronger in taste.&nbsp; The lightest honey used will allow quicker drinking.&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>
An excellent ginger ale can be made by using a cream ale recipe and adding a few ounces of ginger near the end of the boil.&nbsp; Of course, ginger is used in many historic recipes as part of the gruit formulation.&nbsp; It was also traditionally added to taste in finished beer.<BR>
<BR>
I also use my keg systems to make ginger soda.<BR>
<BR>
Alaskan Brewing has a few desert recipes using ginger and beer.<BR>
http://www.alaskanbeer.com/beer/recipes/stout.html<BR>
<BR>
Two books on ginger that I own are:<BR>
<BR>
The Ginger Book by Stephen Fulder<BR>
Ginger East to West by Bruce Cost<BR>
<BR>
Buhner's Sacred and Herbal Beers also has info on Ginger.<BR>
<BR>
A great ginger tea can easily be made from this recipe.&nbsp; It's good hot or cold.<BR>
2 inch piece fresh ginger root peeled &amp; chopped<BR>
4 cups water<BR>
1 small stick cinnamon<BR>
4 cloves<BR>
<BR>
Bring to a boil for 15 minutes and strain to serve.&nbsp; I like it straight, but you can sweeten it with honey.&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>
Ginger is said to alleviate inflammation of the throat from the common cold, congestion, and sinus problems.&nbsp; It also aids in the cleansing of the intestines and upset stomach.&nbsp; It's a general tonic for the system and a natural stimulate.<BR>
<BR>
Hope this gets you started,<BR>
<BR>
JazzboBob</FONT></HTML>