<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2>In a message dated 2/8/01 8:47:38 AM Pacific Standard Time, 
<BR>meadmakr@enteract.com writes:
<BR>
<BR>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&gt; food shop (now, alas, gone) and didn't care for the taste. Another
<BR>&gt; thought has hit me--they wouldnt dehydrate the honey to reduce shipping
<BR>&gt; weight &amp; volume would they???
<BR>
<BR>You're honey is already dehydrated - by the bees. It should be under 17%
<BR>(the average for all honeys). If it contains more than 17% it'll
<BR>ferment. It's unlikely that shippers would dehydrate any further.
<BR>
<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">
<BR>Agreed. &nbsp;In fact, it would be in their best business interests to do so ... 
<BR>water is cheap. &nbsp;It did occur to me though that it was mentioned that the 
<BR>honey was packaged in a "tin". &nbsp;If it was "canned", I wonder if the canning 
<BR>process (AKA heating/pasteurizing) might not have had something to do with 
<BR>the change in flavor and texture.
<BR>
<BR>Warm Regards,
<BR>Shawn
<BR>
<BR></FONT></HTML>