<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
<html>
&nbsp;
<p>Owenbrau@aol.com wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>In a message
dated 11/29/2000 2:49:16 PM Eastern Standard Time,</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>euphonic@flash.net writes:</font></font>
<br>&nbsp;
<br>&nbsp;
<blockquote TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&nbsp;
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>&nbsp;&nbsp; I am not sure
that your malt production techniques are on spot.&nbsp; My</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>friend Finnboggi's various
homemade brown malts provide excellent</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>yields, typically 48% with
no sparge</font></font></blockquote>

<br>&nbsp;
<p><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>I have only been scimming
this thread, so I may have missed something, but</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>48% is terrible! I get ~70-75%
at home, and 83% at work, using modern malts.</font></font>
<p><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>Owen</font></font>
<br>&nbsp;</blockquote>
You most definitely have missed the point.&nbsp; Getting 48% extraction
with a no sparge mash and old fashioned malts is actually rather good.&nbsp;
More often then&nbsp; not, something around&nbsp; 38-42% is more the norm.
Even with modern malts a no sparge mash will be much less efficient then
when one goes with modern methods. Of course if you go with a complicated
and very time consuming period mash schedule you can do about 8-14% or
so better.&nbsp; I would strongly suggest that you check out the no sparge
information at www.promash.com to get you a feel for what is involved with
no sparge mashing.&nbsp; As for modern mashing techniques i can typically
get 80-92% depending upon the mash schedule i use and how much time i want
to take for my sparge, mash out etc.
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; When one goes with old fashioned malts and methods
it is quite common to remash the grist two or three times making lower
gravity vort with each succession. I usually make three ales from one grist
bill.
<blockquote TYPE=CITE>&nbsp;
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>"Beer is living proof that
God loves us, and wants us to be happy" <i>B. Franklin</i></font></font></blockquote>
</html>