<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
<html>
&nbsp;
<p>Owenbrau@aol.com wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>In a message
dated 11/29/2000 2:49:16 PM Eastern Standard Time,</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>euphonic@flash.net writes:</font></font>
<br>&nbsp;
<br>&nbsp;
<blockquote TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>&nbsp;&nbsp;
I say this because no one really knows how the economic advantage of</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>the various malts brakes
down in terms of actual points of extraction</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>per pound per shilling.&nbsp;
Rather i think that drum malting is more cost</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>effective as it is less
labor intensive then floor malting and as a</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>result wood smoked malts
became a rarity.</font></font></blockquote>

<br>&nbsp;
<p><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>Floor vs. drum malting has
nothing to do with the wood-smoke issues. Floor</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>malt is still commercially
available, and isn't much more expensive than</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>drum. It also has no affect
on malt color. Coke-fired kilns made it easier</font></font>
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>and cheaper to make pale
malts.</font></font>
<br>&nbsp;</blockquote>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Well if you look into how old style malts were made
you will quickly discover that hard wood fires were used during the kilning
process.&nbsp; Such processes are much more labor intensive then coke fired
kilns.&nbsp; Unfortunately, the unique character some malts had that were
made possible with the older production methods simply ceased to be commercially
viable with the introduction of&nbsp; new processes.&nbsp; Along with the
changes that allowed ale production to become a large scale industrial
enterprise malt products that were not well suited to mass production disappeared.&nbsp;
Hence, several old styles of ale disappeared.
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; It is true that a few floor malsters exist, off
hand i can only think of three in England and none else where, they are
however more expensive then their drum competitors.&nbsp; I think that
the few floor malsters left have survived because they have mechanized
their operations and are not labor intensive.&nbsp; In any case, i doubt
that they will survive due to EU agricultural policy.
<blockquote TYPE=CITE>&nbsp;
<br><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>Owen</font></font>
<p><font face="arial,helvetica"><font size=-1>"Beer is living proof that
God loves us, and wants us to be happy" <i>B. Franklin</i></font></font></blockquote>
</html>