<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
<html>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Several folks from the list
think that i must dislike hopped ales as i have never mentioned any and
mentioned a preference for attempting herbal ales with hops.&nbsp; I got
on the blower to my friend Filby a couple of weeks ago and mentioned this
matter to him and he provided me with the following recipe.
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The recipe in question was penned by Mister J. Telsford-Ash
who was apparently from Essex, at least i am told that is where is grave
resides, and lived from 1682 to 1731.&nbsp; I know little else of him other
then that he apparently printed a book about house keeping and child rearing
called "The Contented Home" in 1728 which this recipe appeared in originally
and was subsequently reprinted by a Rev. Cuthbert Ash of Essex, whom i
assume was a descendent,&nbsp; in 1887.
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Oh, the measurements are given in imperial measures
and notes follow at the end of the post under the ----------- character
string.&nbsp; This recipe appears to be a no sparge recipe as one is advised
to mash a second time so as to produce a table which one can spice with
a third less hops and herbs then the first running.
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I'll follow up this post with one showing how others
have converted this recipe into modern terms shortly.
<br><b>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Strong Porter </b>(1 Firkin)
<p><b>Grist Bill</b>:
<p>Blown&nbsp; or Snap malt: 18 quarts
<br>fyne malt: 12 1/2 quarts
<br>oats: 6 quarts
<p><b>Sugar</b>:
<p>treacle: 4 pounds
<p><b>Hops</b>:
<p>type unspecified beyond "Kentish": 2 cups
<p><b>Herbs:</b>
<p>Spanish juice (i assume licorice): 2 ounces
<br>Lavender: 2 small spoonfuls
<br>Yarrow: 2 ounces
<br>&nbsp;
<br>&nbsp;
<p><b>Production</b>:
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A single stage infusion mash using 17 gallons of&nbsp;
"near boiling water" is recommended with a rest time of 2 hours.&nbsp;
During the mash a third of the hops were apparently placed into the mashtun.&nbsp;&nbsp;
The remainder of&nbsp; the hops were added at the start of&nbsp; a 90 minute
boil along with&nbsp; 3/4's of the licorice and all of the Yarrow.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
During the last quarter hour of the boil the remainder of the licorice
is added.&nbsp; As the wort begins to cool the Lavender is added.
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; When the wort is cooled it is transferred to a cask
holding the dregs of a " good strong ale"&nbsp; and the treacle.&nbsp;
After the ale stops working the ale is transferred to a second cask and
allowed to age for no less then 4 months.&nbsp; No mention is made as to
recommended priming levels unfortunately.
<p>-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; -&nbsp; I am certain that Snap and blown malt have
been out of production for quite sometime and while some English and Welsh
friends make Blown malt at home i have no idea how one would make Snap
malt.&nbsp; I would recommend that one use home smoked brown malt from
one of the English floor maltsters which would provide something close
if not on target.
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; - Spanish juice seems to have been a reference to
some form of&nbsp; licorice.&nbsp; I would recommend the use of&nbsp; 40
grams of brewing licorice concentrate or 2 ounces of licorice root.
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; - The question of determining the efficiency of
a brewing system using no sparge production methods can be found at the
Pro Mash home page (www.promash.com).&nbsp; Although i know of no&nbsp;
modern means or references of determining second or third running extraction.
<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; - In terms of hop utilization from mashing i am
quite ignorant so if anyone in the readership can recommend a good reference
it would help in finishing up the conversion of this recipe into modern
terms.</html>