<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
<html>
<body bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
&nbsp;
<p>brokk wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE>Greetings Ninkasi and welcome to the list.....
<br>About the passage on bread yeast in your message, where you say it
will ferment meads but not give a good alcohol content....what would that
mean ?&nbsp; 8% ? 13% ?&nbsp; I know it all boils down to taste when final
judgement comes but I'm curious since I've made all my mead batches with
bread yeast and never had any trouble getting them into the 13-15% range,
but I must confess that I mostly go for slightly lower, 8-10% or so.
<p>However, I have come across the problem with them clouding up the meads
and it sure takes a long time to get out, but I try to let my meads mature
for at least 9 monts or so (i'm not a very patient man).
<p>One final question....Has anyone matured a mead in an oak barrel ?&nbsp;
I can get hold of a 1.5 UK gallon one for a good price but since I hardly
ever make any wine I'm not sure it's worth it.
<br>Any opinions out there ?&nbsp; (silly question, I know)
<p>Angus MacIomhair.
<p>judy wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE>&nbsp; <font color="#000000"><font size=-1>Hello
all,&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I am new to this list and I'm not quite sure
how to use this form.&nbsp; My Name is Ninkasi (the one that brews)&nbsp;
mka Judy.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; I am a wine and beer Judge.&nbsp; I have also
won many gold medals, blue ribbons and trophys for my meads.&nbsp; So I
just figured I put my 2 cents in.&nbsp; Temperature has alot to do with
how fast your mead will ferment.&nbsp;&nbsp; At hot temps it ferments fast.&nbsp;
Cold temps it ferments slow.&nbsp; sometimes to cold of a temp will stop
the fermentation,&nbsp; I know I've done it. colder temps also take much
longer to ferment.&nbsp; Hot temps on the other hand will ferment real
fast.&nbsp; I"ve learned over the 20 something years that I've been making
wine and meads you don't want a high temp, it gives the mead a funny taste
to it. Almost a sherry taste. Also yeast does make the diffrence.&nbsp;
Wild yeast you take a chance of a vinegar spore taking over, bread yeast
will ferment but you don't get a good alchohol content and it will cloud
up your mead and will have a yeasty taste to it and it will be sweet.&nbsp;
beer yeast, well it only ferments to about 9% before the alcohol will kill
off the yeast.&nbsp; Wine yeast will ferment your mead dry up to 20%&nbsp;
of course you can't preserve a 9% as long as a 20% mead.&nbsp;&nbsp; I
also believe mead had a lower alcohol content and was sweeter in the 1500,&nbsp;
Lack of specialized yeast. They used bread yeast and also wild yeast.&nbsp;
I hope this has helped some.Ninkasi/Judy</font></font> <font color="#000000"><font size=-1><a href="http://users.southeast.net/~judy">http://users.southeast.net/~judy</a>judy@leading.net</font></font></blockquote>
</blockquote>

</body>
</html>