hist-brewing: corn

Sean Richens srichens at sprint.ca
Fri Dec 28 07:46:50 PST 2001


I'm currently trying to malt some corn as Shawn describes.  I haven't really
been paying close enough attention (malting is attention-intensive) but just
want to see if this popping corn has a decent germination rate.

Otherwise, if you are just wanting to use corn in regular ales and Pilsners,
you can crush it in a Corona mill and do a double mash.  I've used corn meal
before and it cooks to a gloopy texture that sends up balls of boiling corn
lava at you.  The corn can be made more manageable by adding, say, half its
weight in malt, mashing in at 150F for 30 minutes, then boiling until the
corn is fully swollen.

You then combine this with the rest of the malt so that the mixture ends up
at the desired mash temperature.

Corn adds a bit of a distinctive taste that is nice in a light lager with
some Cascade hops.

Sean

----- Original Message -----
From: <NeophyteSG at aol.com>
To: <hist-brewing at www.pbm.com>
Sent: Thursday, December 27, 2001 11:58 AM
Subject: Re: hist-brewing: corn


> In a message dated 12/27/01 9:41:46 AM Pacific Standard Time,
> jazzman712 at hotmail.com writes:
>
>
> > I was wondering if this could work.  I have a farmer that has offered to
> > give me as much corn as I want for brewing.  The trouble is, I've never
> > used
> > raw corn in beer.  How do you process it?  I've used corn sugar before
and
> > make a good porter using the sugar, but how do you get the corn to break
> > down to a point where it you can use it?  Can it be malted?  How is it
> > processed into sugar?  Do you grind it and add it to the mash?  Will it
add
> >
> > to the alcohol level?  Or does it just add flavoring?  My books don't
tell
> > me much about raw corn.  I'm doing all-grain brewing right now.  Help!
> >
>
> Do a search of the web for "chicha" (Latin-American corn beer).  Short
answer
> to your question: corn can be malted or you can use amylase.  Historically
in
> some regions, the corn was chewed then spit into the fermenter where the
> enzymes in the saliva converted the starch to sugars.  Hmmm ... spit beer
...
> thanks, I'll stick to amylase! :)
>
> Warm Regards,
> Shawn
>





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