hist-brewing: Re: hist-brewing-digest V1 #868

Randy Mosher rmosher at 21stcentury.net
Tue Oct 9 07:33:17 PDT 2001


> From: "Steven Eldredge" <stevene at metrocast.net>
> Date: Mon, 8 Oct 2001 09:35:45 -0400
> 
> I am brewing a Graetzer at the NH Craft Brewers Festival with another =
> member of the homebrew club that I belong to. I am posting our recipe =
> and methods for your comment, and we have a few questions for those of =
> you who have brewed this or a similar beer. The recipe is based on the =
> one in "Top Fermenting Oddities from the North of Germany" by Randy =
> Mosher, Published in Zymurgy Vol. 23 No. 5.
> Batch Size 11 Gallons, Efficiency 75%
> 
> 17 Lbs. Wheat Malt, Smoked (Ireks German Red)
> 
> 6 Lbs. Wheat Malt, Smoked and Toasted to a pale copper color
> 
> 2 Lbs. Rice Hulls
> 
> Mash Schedule: 122 deg. Rest 15 min. 148 deg. Rest 60 min.  175 deg mash =
> out.
> 
> 6 Oz. Czech Saaz 3.5aa 75 Min.
> 
> O.G. 1.058, 44.6 IBU.
> 
> I smoked the grain about 1 foot above an open seasoned Maple fire that =
> had burned to embers. I used Green Apple wood that had been soaked in =
> water for two days to make the smoke. I spread the grain out in a window =
> screen and smoked it for 10-15 min. I smoked the grain until it had =
> darkened slightly. (about 2 or 3 deg. L) when the grain was done =
> smoking, it was cool enough to hold in my hand but not for long. I would =
> guess that the grain temp. was about 140 - 160 degrees.=20
> 
> Is it possible that I destroyed the enzymes during the smoking process? =
> Would you recommend adding Amylase Enzyme to the mash?
> 
> The grain is Very smoky, more so then the peated malt that I have used =
> in the past. (it actually smells kind of like a Slim Jim) I am concerned =
> that it will produce too strong of a phenolic quality in the beer. What =
> do you think?
> 
> We are considering lowering the bitterness to about 30 IBU's and raising =
> the conversion rest temp to 154 deg. This would accent the malt flavors =
> a bit. Any comments on this?

In my experience, this beer works by balancing the rich, creamy texture of
the wheat malt against the combined bitterness and smoke. I've never gotten
much of what I'd call "malt" flavor out of wheat. Be cautious to not shift
the balance too much.

As far as the quality of the smoke, it's impossible for anyone but you to
decide. If you feel it's too much, maybe you can allow it to air out a bit
before you brew. Some of the smoke components are volatile, and will waft
away to some small extent if you leave the malt where the air can get at it.

FWIW, the BBQ guys usually caution against green wood for smoking, although
this, like evereything BBQ is debated fiercely, and is also based on
cooking/smoking times are very much longer (4-12 hours or more). The feeling
is that green wood contributes more creosote, and if you can see more that a
wisp of bluish smoke you're doing something wrong. It's the denser, white
smoke that carries the creosote. But, remember this is for cooking. Only
your nose can decide. When I did it, i smoked an hour on burr oak, whichh
seems to be intermediate in character between white and red oak.

I can't help you with the RIMS thing except to say that if it were me, I'd
have an extra couple of pounds of rice hulls to toss in if it gets a bit
sticky.

You'll enjoy the beer. Unexpectedly delicious.

Best of luck,

--Randy Mosher
> 
> In a message dated 10/8/01 8:22:03 AM Central Daylight Time,
> stevene at metrocast.net writes:
> 
>> when the grain was done smoking, it was cool enough to hold in my hand but
>> not for long. I would guess that the grain temp. was about 140 - 160
> degrees. 
>> 
>> 
>> Is it possible that I destroyed the enzymes during the smoking process?
>> Would you recommend adding Amylase Enzyme to the mash?
>> 
> Let's think about this.  The standard mash temperature is about 152 deg,
> for 60-90 minutes, and that certainly doesn't hurt the enzymes.  You estimate
> that your grain got up to 140-160 for not more than 15 minutes.
> Conclusion:  Shouldn't hurt it.

Plus, the enzymes are much more heat-resisant when they're dry. You should
be fine with this. 


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