hist-brewing: guit odds & sods

Wierd House kirin at adisfwb.com
Sat Oct 21 13:21:35 PDT 2000


I am not familiar with the second plant at all, However, Labrador Tea or Bog
tea is available over a good deal of North America.  If I am not mistaken
(no promises) it is a native plant to N.A. and if that is the case then most
likely would not be the "Marsh Rosemary" used in period recipes.  Side note,
ledum does indeed make a wonderful tea, although it has diuretic properites
and in some people has been known to induce heart palpitations and increased
blood pressure, so use with caution.
----- Original Message -----
From: Joe Knapp <jmk at copperas.com>
To: adam larsen <euphonic at flash.net>
Cc: <hist-brewing at pbm.com>
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2000 12:59 PM
Subject: Re: hist-brewing: guit odds & sods


>
> I notice from doing web searches that there are at least two different
> herbs which have been called "marsh rosemary." One is Ledum palustre
> (marsh tea, marsh rosemary, Labrador tea). See
> http://copperas.com/ledupalu.jpg
>
> Another is a completely unrelated plant, Limonium carolinianum (sea
> lavender, marsh rosemary). See
> http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/limoniumcaro.html
>
> How can one be sure one is getting the plant used in gruits of old?
>
> Joe
>
>  On Tue, 17 Oct 2000, adam
> larsen wrote:
>
> >     It gives me great pleasure to announce that i have located stateside
> > supplier of Marsh Rosemary and Myrica Gale (sweet gale) with very
> > reasonable prices! Those interested should contact  Contact Nancy
> > Kaytis-Slocum via email at:  wldweeds at humboldt1.com or
> > info at wildweeds.com.  If you do purchase these brewing related herbs from
> > her be sure to thank her for providing them to historically interested
> > brewers.
>
  --------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------
> >
> >     On a different note, i have noticed that a great number of  brewers
> > hold to the misconception that their was a set and defined base for
> > gruits.  This is simply untrue, their appears to have been a vast
> > variety of gruits, a great number which lacked Yarrow, Sweet Gale and
> > Marsh Rosemary all together.
> >     Instead, it appears to me that gruits were determined by what was
> > available locally and preferred by regional folkways and preferences
> > which changed over time.  Of course trade centers had access to a wider
> > variety then isolated communities but one should not think that some
> > formula for gruit composition met with wide spread acceptance.
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
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>
>
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