hist-brewing: Re: Odense Old Style Ale - conclusion

adam larsen euphonic at flash.net
Thu Jun 22 09:20:10 PDT 2000


    As it so happens i did not give any tasting impressions with this particular
ale which was a result of an oversight on my part.  In so far as the SCA is
concerned i am not a member and i really have no idea regarding what kind of
ales their membership prefers.  I do think that it would be safe to say however
that if you prefer modern industrial lagers you will not like any gruited ales.
If on the other hand you are receptive to high gravity Baltic and Slavic ales or
some of the more exotic Belgian styles you very well may like this one.
    Certainly most gruited ales are quite different from almost all commercially
available beverages.  Nonetheless, most are actually quite good, although it
does take some getting use to as does anything new.  Plenty of times one can
tone down a given spice or sugar used in these ales to arrive at a flavor
somewhat less exotic.
    As for the taste of  this ale, when made properly, is complex, quite heavy
with plenty of mouth feel and no one flavor being prominent.  Although
bitterness is clearly perceptible this ale does have a distinct sweetness that
is similar to a modern sweetened Baltic ale.  A distinct tannic flavor is
present as is a wood like quality that present in all ales that use shavings.
This is an extremely aromatic ale with definite although not aggressive smoky
characteristic.  None of  the spices are readily definable although it is as
aggressively spiced as some commercial Belgian ales.
    Certainly one can easily scale the recipe down to three gallons although i
would recommend the use of oak chips if you use a carboy or keg in both the
primary and secondary fermenter.
    My next set of posting will deal with lower gravity and lighter bodied ales
including fruit based ones.

Joel Plutchak wrote:

> adam larsen wrote:
> >At long last and with apologies for the delay comes information on
> >how to actually make one of my favorite styles of ale.
>
> [...]
>
>    I missed the first part(s) of this, so my apologies if you've
> already mentioned this, but... what does this taste like?  Is it
> too assertive (or just plain weird :-) for any but dyed-in-the-wool
> SCAers to stomach?  Would your average beer drinker like it, or is
> it more of an acquired taste?
>    Sounds interesting enough for me to make, but I'm thinking
> maybe a 3-gallon batch would be prudent, at least the first
> time.
> --
> Joel Plutchak <plutchak at uiuc.edu>
> Software Developer, National Center for Supercomputing Applications
>
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