hist-brewing: measurments

Mills, Scott Scott.Mills at COMPAQ.com
Wed Apr 5 13:47:55 PDT 2000


Search through the archives of this list for "Domesday"
and you will find that there has been a lot of previous 
discussion about this recipe.

After all the discussion and conversions what was 
eventually agreed upon by most people was that the
ratio of barley:wheat:oats are virtually 1:1:4 and the
recipes uses about 4 lbs of grain per gallon.  

These discussions included things such as the various
possible definitions of "quarter" as a volume and/or 
weight measurement for the grain as well as the
definition of a "gallon".

For those who say that the malts are different,
yes they probably are, but we have to start somewhere
and getting the measurements close seems the right
place to start (it was for me when I did this recipe).
Floor malting methods have not changed much in
centuries and I imagine an experienced maltster
would have produced well modified consistent malts.
The biggest differences in malts probably come from
the modern kilning methods.

Remember that the malts from this period would not 
have been intentionally darkened in kilning.  In 
fact I have only seen one period recipe that speaks 
of intentionally darkened malts (If other people have 
primary references indicating the use of dark malts 
please share them).  The one reference I have seen calls
for a handful of malts to be roasted in an iron pot. 

You can buy malted oats, barley, and wheat so take the time
and uses malted oats NOT flaked oats as it does make a 
difference particularly in the volume measurement.  
If you want to get under-modified malts to play with then
you can buy those also (Budvar still uses under-modified 
malts).

Other decisions... 

You will need to make are things like
additional flavoring such as gruit, hops, or nothing 
at all.  For my redaction I grew and used Alecost as
my brewing herb.  

Additionally, with a grain bill this large are you 
going to take first runnings and make a strong beer,
second runnings for an ordinary, and third runnings
for a small beer?  If you consider that this was a 
common practice then the redaction of the Domesday 
reference into a real recipe can be interpreted a
countless number of ways.  Doubtless the monks didn't
use all of this grain at once so there where many
batches of ale made over a good length of time.  I think
it is possible and perhaps even likely that the grain 
bill changed slightly from brew to brew and the ratio
of barley:wheat:oats changed.

Pick a possible and plausible interpretation and make a 
beer that pleases you.

Regards,  
  _____  

Scott Mills	 
Scott.Mills at Compaq.Com 

aka Lord Eadric Anstapa
visit the SCA Brewing Page http://sca_brew.homestead.com

	 

 



> -----Original Message-----
> From: Eric A. Rhude [mailto:ateno at panix.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2000 12:14 PM
> To: hist-brewing at pbm.com
> Subject: hist-brewing: measurments
> 
> 
> I have something to bounce off all of you....
> 
> We all wrassle with (well the ale brewers at least)
> the idea of how many pounds of malt did they us,
> 'x quarters of malt makes y gallons of ale'.
> 
> Lets throw away the notion that we have to weigh
> things.  They are measuring in quarters why dont we?
> 
> So to quote a recent receipt posted here earlier:
> 
> "The monks of St. Paul's Cathedral brewed 67,814 gallons
> of ale using 175 quarters of Barley, 175 quarters of
> wheat, and 708 quarters of oats."
> 
> Assuming 8 bushels to a peck (which is see as standard in 
> earlier times, stop me if I am wrong).
> 
> 1058 quarters = 8464 Bushels
> 
> a bushel is today apprx 209 litres dry measure, 
> are bushels differnt now?
> 
> 2454560 Litres = 2228944.05 dry quarts
> 
> http://www.webcom.com/legacysy/convert2/
> 
> 2228944.05 divided by 67814 gallons = 
> 
> 32.87 dry quarts / 8.22 dry gallons of malt per gallon of ale.
> 
> Now what is easier measuring exactaly x lbs y oz
> 
> or fill up your quart measurment 32 times with a bit extra..
> 
> Now my malt is about 1.05 lbs per dry quart, so
> for the engineers and others out there.
> 
> 7.83 lbs of malt per gallon of ale.
> 
> I have made ale with 8 lbs per gallon and it 
> turns out great..
> 
> 
> Thoughts / corrections??
> 
> I know there is a varience dependant on wet or dry malt and 
> amount of swelling but we have that today anyway..
> They did it that way, why dont we?
> 
> 
> Eric Rhude
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> QVI CONVERTERIET HAEC IMMODICE LITTERATVS EST
> 
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