hist-brewing: Re: hist-brewing-digest V1 #429

Samantha Endara cybersamie at hotmail.com
Fri Oct 22 11:08:22 PDT 1999


From: Fu Ching Lan (Samantha)
Does anyone know where I can get "Mulling Spices" packages at?


>From: owner-hist-brewing-digest at rt.com
>Reply-To: hist-brewing at pbm.com
>To: hist-brewing-digest
>Subject: hist-brewing-digest V1 #429
>Date: Fri, 22 Oct 1999 04:00:09 -0700
>
>hist-brewing-digest       Friday, 22 October 1999      Volume 01 : Number 
>429
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>From: "Richard" <Richard at WowMe.com>
>Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 08:08:14 -0400
>Subject: Re: hist-brewing: natural estrogenic compounds
>
>Sounds like the sleepy properties of hops really ARE something to consider!
>(No disrespect meant to your friend in the making of this joke.)
>
>Richard
>
>- ----- Original Message -----
>From: <PBLoomis at aol.com>
>To: <isenhour at uiuc.edu>; <hist-brewing at pbm.com>
>Sent: Thursday, October 21, 1999 6:33 AM
>Subject: Re: hist-brewing: natural estrogenic compounds
>
>
> > In a message dated 10/20/1999 11:39:30 AM EST, isenhour at uiuc.edu writes:
> >
> > << MHO the route of intake would most likely be inhalation or possibly
> >  cutanious absorption.  >>
> >
> >     Probably cutanious absorption.  A woman I know was raised in Oregon,
>and
> > went to pick hops at age 14.  An hour later they found her passed out in
>the
> > field.
> > She still is violently allergic to hops (and chicken) and cannot drink
>beer.
> >     Scotti
> >
> > 
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>
>- -------------------------------------------------------------------------
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>------------------------------
>
>From: Jeff Renner <nerenner at umich.edu>
>Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 08:58:09 -0400
>Subject: hist-brewing: Re: hist-brewing-digest V1 #427
>
>Al Korzonas, Lockport, Illinois, USA <korz at brewinfo.org> wrote:
>
> >Ships' tonnage is based on how many
> >ton/tun casks of beer they could hold.
>
>Well, not quite, at least not directly or today.  From World Book
>Encyclopedia, 1988 edition, vol. S, p. 416:
>
>"Deadweight tonnage is a ship's actual carrying capacity measured in long
>tons. ... includes cargo, crew, passengers, fuel, supplies and spare parts.
>Freighters and tankers arte generally described in terms of deadweight
>tonnage."
>
>It also describes two other measurements of tonnage, displacement tonnage,
>"the number of long tons displaced ... by a ship ... is generally used for
>naval craft," and gross tonnage, "the amount of a ship's enclosed space.
>It is a measure of volume, not weight, and is expressed in units of 100
>cubic feet ... .  A ship of 5000 gross tons has 500,000 cubic feet ... of
>enclosed space.  Passenger ships are usually measured in terms of gross
>tonnage."
>
>Jeff
>
>- -=-=-=-=-
>Jeff Renner in Ann Arbor, Michigan USA, c/o nerenner at umich.edu
>"One never knows, do one?"  Fats Waller, American Musician, 1904-1943.
>
>
>
>- -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>To unsubscribe from this list, send email to majordomo at pbm.com containing
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>if
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>
>------------------------------
>
>From: "Nick Sasso" <njs at mccalla.com>
>Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 10:06:16 -0400
>Subject: hist-brewing: Re: hist-brewing-digest V1 #427
>
>The gross tonnage figure of 100 cubic feet might actually represent the =
>space required for a "tun cask of beer".  Remember that these figures come 
>=
>from somewhere and practical history is often the source..  The two =
>information sources may not be in conflict after all.
>
>Nick Sasso
>
>
>    Date:     Thu, 21 Oct 1999 08:58:09 -0400
>    From:     Jeff Renner <nerenner at umich.edu>
>
>Al Korzonas, Lockport, Illinois, USA <korz at brewinfo.org> wrote:
>
> >Ships' tonnage is based on how many
> >ton/tun casks of beer they could hold.
>
>Well, not quite, at least not directly or today.  From World Book
>Encyclopedia, 1988 edition, vol. S, p. 416:
>
>"Deadweight tonnage is a ship's actual carrying capacity measured in long
>tons. ... includes cargo, crew, passengers, fuel, supplies and spare =
>parts.
>Freighters and tankers arte generally described in terms of deadweight
>tonnage."
>
>It also describes two other measurements of tonnage, displacement tonnage,
>"the number of long tons displaced ... by a ship ... is generally used for
>naval craft," and gross tonnage, "the amount of a ship's enclosed space.
>It is a measure of volume, not weight, and is expressed in units of 100
>cubic feet ... .  A ship of 5000 gross tons has 500,000 cubic feet ... of
>enclosed space.  Passenger ships are usually measured in terms of gross
>tonnage."
>
>Jeff
>
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>          =20
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>- -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>To unsubscribe from this list, send email to majordomo at pbm.com containing
>the words "unsubscribe hist-brewing" (or unsubscribe hist-brewing-digest, 
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>
>------------------------------
>
>From: brewinfo at xnet.com (BrewInfo)
>Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 14:01:27 -0500 (CDT)
>Subject: hist-brewing: Re: hist-brewing-digest V1 #427
>
>Jeff writes (quoting me):
> >>Ships' tonnage is based on how many
> >>ton/tun casks of beer they could hold.
> >
> >Well, not quite, at least not directly or today.  From World Book
> >Encyclopedia, 1988 edition, vol. S, p. 416:
> >
> >"Deadweight tonnage is a ship's actual carrying capacity measured in long
> >tons. ... includes cargo, crew, passengers, fuel, supplies and spare 
>parts.
> >Freighters and tankers arte generally described in terms of deadweight
> >tonnage."
> >
> >It also describes two other measurements of tonnage, displacement 
>tonnage,
> >"the number of long tons displaced ... by a ship ... is generally used 
>for
> >naval craft," and gross tonnage, "the amount of a ship's enclosed space.
> >It is a measure of volume, not weight, and is expressed in units of 100
> >cubic feet ... .  A ship of 5000 gross tons has 500,000 cubic feet ... of
> >enclosed space.  Passenger ships are usually measured in terms of gross
> >tonnage."
>
>Perhaps it is old and derived... I'm just repeating what I've heard.
>It is notable that that website I mentioned gives the definition that
>in 1824, the Imperial Gallon was definied as the volume of 10 pounds
>of water (at a particular temperature, of course).  Since a Tun/Ton
>cask holds 216 Imperial Gallons, that's about 2160 pounds or not too
>far from our modern "ton" measure of weight.  The website also says
>that a Tun/Ton is 60912 cubic inches, which, if my math is correct
>is about 423 cubic feet... alas, that's not even close to your ships'
>measure of volume.  Oh well.
>
>The rest of my information is accurate... I shouldn't have posted
>that last speculative bit, or I should have said "I've heard that
>ship's tonnage is somehow releated to how many tun/ton casks of
>beer they could hold."
>
>Al.
>
>Al Korzonas, Lockport, Illinois, USA
>korz at brewinfo.org
>http://www.brewinfo.org/brewinfo/
>
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>
>------------------------------
>
>From: PBLoomis at aol.com
>Date: Fri, 22 Oct 1999 06:34:13 EDT
>Subject: Re: hist-brewing: natural estrogenic compounds
>
>     I think maybe we're getting alarmed by a buzzword.  Natural estrogens 
>are
>present in a wide variety of foods, and are in fact normally present in the
>male
>Homo Sap body.
>     Get in touch with your feminine side, guys.
>
>     Scotti
>     "I got in touch with my feminine side, and she slapped my face."
>
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>------------------------------
>
>End of hist-brewing-digest V1 #429
>**********************************
>

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