hist-brewing: Historic Liqueur

Chris J. Caronna, R. Ph. ccaronna at swbell.net
Thu Apr 1 18:09:48 PST 1999


Nathan,
All actively fermenting liquids are carbonated. Just sample an actively
fermenting wine.  You will find it bubbly as it is carbonated with carbon
dioxide produced by the working yeast.  As for a ferment in the bottle to
produce carbonation, the references I have point to the 1690ish discovery of the
cork by Dom Perignon.  Even the cork would not allow much CO2 to build up before
the cork blew.  Before this cork "discovery" fermentable liquids were stored in
wood or barrels which would have allowed the carbon dioxide to escape preventing
much carbonation.  Some of the recipies in Cindy's book "A Sip Through Time"
call for stopping up a bottle tight with still enough sugar to allow some
carbonation.  The trick is how did they bottle it up tight?

Perhaps someone else out there can shed some further light on this.

Hope that helped,
Morgan the Vintner

NATHAN T MOORE wrote:

> Is it possible to justify a carbonated liqueur as being historically
> accurate?  If so, how would they have gone about it?  I am thinking of
> pre 1700's history.
>
> Thanks,
> Nate
>
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