hist-brewing: Cloudy Metheglyns.

Mansfield, Scott Scott_Mansfield at uscs.com
Fri Jan 15 12:52:56 PST 1999


Not all substances naturally settle to the bottom of your fermentation. The
most common ingredient that can remain in suspension is protein and the most
common way to remove it is by adding a fining agent. These additions absorb
or otherwise attach themselves to microscopic pieces of protein and other
materials and drop to the bottom. There are several fining agents and each
has a characteristic that makes it preferable to clear up a given situation.
The most common for removing haze seem to be:
· Betonite - Use this whitish powdery clay to remove protein. Doesn't affect
color or taste. Since this fining agent swells like a sponge when it gets in
a liquid, be careful not to add too much. I once added a couple of teaspoons
to a gallon of wine and the stuff filled the bottom quarter of the bottle
with a runny mud.
· Isinglass - Don't ask me how anyone thought to use powdered sturgeon
bladder to remove tannins and otherwise clear a beverage, but let's be
thankful that someone tried it. Although a relatively expensive fining
agent, it works wonderfully.
Sparkloid -  A commercial product that works like Betonite only better.

Good luck

Scott Mansfield
scott_mansfield at uscs.com



-----Original Message-----
From: brokk [mailto:h940114 at stud.kol.su.se]
Sent: Friday, January 15, 1999 10:58 AM
To: hist-brewing at pbm.com
Subject: hist-brewing: Cloudy Metheglyns.


The last year or so I've made an increasing number of metheglyns, and
all of them has been cloudy or hazy to some degree.  The melomels, which
is what i make most all seem to turn out just fine after 4 to 6 months,
but the metheglyns seem to retain theii hazy appearance even after 6+
months.
The 1st metheglyn I ever made, still have a pint of it left is subject
to the same problem.
There are no particles left in it of any kind, and you can see through
the bottle, but it isn't as clear as the melomels.
I've checked with friends that make metheglyns that turn out just like
my melomels and we haven't found any differences.  Could a small
alteration in fermenting temperature, say 2 or 3 C/4-6F be the cause of
it all ?

For my metheglyns I often use cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, Seville Orange
and a  pinch of tea (Earl Grey's Breakfast Tea) for the tannic acid.
All equipment is cleaned with the same commercially available cleaner I
use for my melomels and room temp. during the fermentation is
20-23C/68-73F.

Angus MacIomhair.


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