hist-brewing: looking for sources

Owenbrau1 at aol.com Owenbrau1 at aol.com
Tue Jan 5 12:38:07 PST 1999


In a message dated 1/5/99 2:49:31 PM Eastern Standard Time, bjm10 at cornell.edu
writes:

<< In the 18th century, "ale" in English was reserved for strong brews and 
 "beer" for the weaker, at least in some areas.
  >>

in the US, "Beer" meant "lager", and "Ale" meant "strong", as well as "ale" If
your beer was an ale, you could call it such, and if it was strong, you had
to. This is also where the style "Malt Liqour" came from; being able to call a
beer strong without violating ATF regs(no words indicating strength). For some
reason, they typically called out "Stout" and "Porter", as well. This
continues forward to today; in some states, until very recently, some strong
lagers actually had to be labeled "Ale"!
gotta love it when laws are written by the clueless.

Owen ap Robert

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