hist-brewing: stabilizing mead

allotta allotta at earthlink.net
Thu Aug 20 12:04:11 PDT 1998


What you are talking about is flash pasturization.  Forthat to happen
you need to acheive 170 degrees for 30 seconds.  140 degrees need to be
held for 30 minutes.
For wine yeast, 140 may be enough to kill them.  However, most people do
not have equipment to cool rapidly enough to preserve the wine.

Nick Sasso wrote:

> Good Meaders all,
>
> Greetings and Merry Respiration to you.  I have had a couple of
> batches go off when warmed (blueberry stains, by the way).  Sulfites
> reduce the numbers of people who can enjoy my wines, sorbates are
> dicey sometimes.
>
> HEAT is your best friend of reliability.  The most consistant results
> I have gotten for stopping fermentation absolutely comes from
> reheating the mead after fermentation.  I know if sounds looney, but
> if you siphon quietly, and heat QUICKLY, you don't damage the wine.
> You only heat to the point where vapor just begins to rise off the
> fluid ( about 145F or so) and then cool quickly.  You have more
> chances for oxidation and infection, but careful transfer and
> sanitation make it a safe practice.  Kills the yeast, and don't lose
> character of honey.
>
> Nick Sasso
> Proud supporter of Lalvin K1V-1116.
>
>
>
> -
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